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Fransson, Eleonor I.ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9042-4832
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Publications (10 of 97) Show all publications
Johansson, L., Lingfors, H., Golsäter, M., Kristenson, M. & Fransson, E. I. (2019). Can physical activity compensate for low socioeconomic status with regard to poor self-rated health and low quality-of-life?. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 17(1), 1-10, Article ID 33.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can physical activity compensate for low socioeconomic status with regard to poor self-rated health and low quality-of-life?
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2019 (English)In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 1-10, article id 33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Both high socioeconomic status (SES) and high physical activity (PA) are associated with better self-rated health (SRH) and higher quality-of-life (QoL).

AIM: To investigate whether high levels of PA may compensate for the association between low SES and subjective health outcomes in terms of poorer SRH and lower QoL.

METHOD: Data from a cross-sectional, population-based study (n = 5326) was utilized. Multiple logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the associations between indicators of SES (economic situation and educational level), SRH and QoL, as well as between the combination of SES and PA in relation to SRH and QoL.

RESULT: Participants with high PA and economic problems had approximately the same OR for good SRH as those with low PA and without economic problems (OR 1.75 [95% CI 1.20-2.54] and 1.81 [1.25-2.63] respectively). Participants with high PA and low education had higher odds for good SRH (OR 3.34 [2.96-5.34] compared to those with low PA and high education (OR 1.46 [0.89-2.39]).Those with high PA and economic problems had an OR of 2.09 [1.42-3.08], for high QoL, while the corresponding OR for those with low PA and without economic problems was 4.38 [2.89-6.63].

CONCLUSION: Physically active people with low SES, had the same or even better odds to report good SRH compared to those with low PA and high SES. For QoL the result was not as consistent. The findings highlight the potential for promotion of PA to reduce SES-based inequalities in SRH.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019
Keywords
Health dialogue, Physical activity, Quality-of-life, Self-rated health, Socioeconomic status
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43213 (URN)10.1186/s12955-019-1102-4 (DOI)000458183400002 ()30736815 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85061263688 (Scopus ID)GOA HHJ 2019 (Local ID)GOA HHJ 2019 (Archive number)GOA HHJ 2019 (OAI)
Available from: 2019-03-01 Created: 2019-03-01 Last updated: 2019-03-06Bibliographically approved
Stadin, M., Nordin, M., Broström, A., Magnusson Hanson, L., Westerlund, H. & Fransson, E. I. (2019). Repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work, and development of suboptimal self-rated health: findings from a 4-year follow-up of the SLOSH study. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work, and development of suboptimal self-rated health: findings from a 4-year follow-up of the SLOSH study
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2019 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The knowledge about the association between Information and Communication Technology (ICT) demands at work and self-rated health (SRH) is insufficient. The aim of this study was to examine the association between repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work, and risk of suboptimal SRH, and to determine modifications by sex or socioeconomic position (SEP).

Methods

A prospective design was used, including repeated measurement of ICT demands at work, measured 2 years apart. SRH was measured at baseline and at follow-up after 4 years. The data were derived from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH), including 4468 gainfully employees (1941 men, 2527 women) with good SRH at baseline.

Results

In the total study sample, repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work was associated with suboptimal SRH at follow-up (OR 1.34 [CI 1.06–1.70]), adjusted for age, sex, SEP, health behaviours, BMI, job strain and social support. An interaction between ICT demands and sex was observed (p = 0.010). The risk was only present in men (OR 1.53 [CI 1.09–2.16]), and not in women (OR 1.17 [CI 0.85–1.62]). The risk of suboptimal SRH after consistently high ICT demands at work was most elevated in participants with high SEP (OR 1.68 [CI 1.02–2.79]), adjusted for age, sex, health behaviours, BMI and job strain. However, no significant interaction between ICT demands and SEP regarding SRH was observed.

Conclusion

Repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work was associated with suboptimal SRH at follow-up, and the association was modified by sex.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
ICT demands at work; Occupational health; Work-related stress; Self-rated health; Gender differences; Socioeconomic position
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42592 (URN)10.1007/s00420-019-01407-6 (DOI)XYZ ()30684000 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-1141
Available from: 2019-01-11 Created: 2019-01-11 Last updated: 2019-01-29
Hallgren, J., Fransson, E., Reynolds, C. A., Finkel, D., Pedersen, N. L. & Dahl Aslan, A. K. (2018). Cognitive trajectories in relation to hospitalization among older Swedish adults. Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), 74, 9-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive trajectories in relation to hospitalization among older Swedish adults
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2018 (English)In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 74, p. 9-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION:

Research indicate that cognitive impairment might be related to hospitalization, but little is known about these effects over time.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess cognitive change before and after hospitalization among older adults in a population-based longitudinal study with up to 25 years of follow-up.

METHOD:

A longitudinal study on 828 community living men and women aged 50-86 from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Ageing (SATSA) were linked to The Swedish National Inpatient Register. Up to 8 assessments of cognitive performance (general cognitive ability, verbal, spatial/fluid, memory, and processing speed) from 1986 to 2010 were available. Latent growth curve modelling was used to assess the association between cognitive performance and hospitalization including spline models to analyse cognitive trajectories pre- and post-hospitalization.

RESULTS:

A total of 735 persons (89%) had at least one hospital admission during the follow-up. Mean age at first hospitalization was 70.2 (±9.3)years. Persons who were hospitalized exhibited a lower mean level of cognitive performance in general ability, processing speed and spatial/fluid ability compared with those who were not hospitalized. The two-slope models revealed steeper cognitive decline before hospitalization than after among those with at least one hospitalization event, as compared to non-hospitalized persons who showed steeper cognitive decline after the centering age of 70 years.

CONCLUSIONS:

Persons being hospitalized in late life have lower cognitive performance across all assessed domains. The results indicate that the main decline occurs before the hospitalization, and not after. This might indicate that when you get treatment you also benefit cognitively.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Cognition; Hospitalization; Latent growth curve modelling; Longitudinal study; Old age
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-29963 (URN)10.1016/j.archger.2017.09.002 (DOI)000415983300002 ()28923532 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85029433562 (Scopus ID)HHJARNIS (Local ID)HHJARNIS (Archive number)HHJARNIS (OAI)
Available from: 2016-05-19 Created: 2016-05-19 Last updated: 2019-04-09Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, S. T., Batty, G. D., Pentti, J., Virtanen, M., Alfredsson, L., Fransson, E. I., . . . Kivimäki, M. (2018). Obesity and loss of disease-free years owing to major non-communicable diseases: a multicohort study. Lancet. Public health, 3(10), e490-e497
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Obesity and loss of disease-free years owing to major non-communicable diseases: a multicohort study
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2018 (English)In: Lancet. Public health, ISSN 2468-2667, Vol. 3, no 10, p. e490-e497Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Obesity increases the risk of several chronic diseases, but the extent to which the obesity-related loss of disease-free years varies by lifestyle category and across socioeconomic groups is unclear. We estimated the number of years free from major non-communicable diseases in adults who are overweight and obese, compared with those who are normal weight.

METHODS: We pooled individual-level data on body-mass index (BMI) and non-communicable diseases from men and women with no initial evidence of these diseases in European cohort studies from the Individual-Participant-Data Meta-Analysis in Working Populations consortium. BMI was assessed at baseline (1991-2008) and non-communicable diseases (incident type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, cancer, asthma, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) were ascertained via linkage to records from national health registries, repeated medical examinations, or self-report. Disease-free years from age 40 years to 75 years associated with underweight (BMI <18·5 kg/m2), overweight (≥25 kg/m2 to <30 kg/m2), and obesity (class I [mild] ≥30 kg/m2 to <35 kg/m2; class II-III [severe] ≥35 kg/m2) compared with normal weight (≥18·5 kg/m2 to <25 kg/m2) were estimated.

FINDINGS: Of 137 503 participants from ten studies, we excluded 6973 owing to missing data and 10 349 with prevalent disease at baseline, resulting in an analytic sample of 120 181 participants. Of 47 127 men, 211 (0·4%) were underweight, 21 468 (45·6%) normal weight, 20 738 (44·0%) overweight, 3982 (8·4%) class I obese, and 728 (1·5%) class II-III obese. The corresponding numbers among the 73 054 women were 1493 (2·0%), 44 760 (61·3%), 19 553 (26·8%), 5670 (7·8%), and 1578 (2·2%), respectively. During 1 328 873 person-years at risk (mean follow-up 11·5 years [range 6·3-18·6]), 8159 men and 8100 women developed at least one non-communicable disease. Between 40 years and 75 years, the estimated number of disease-free years was 29·3 (95% CI 28·8-29·8) in normal-weight men and 29·4 (28·7-30·0) in normal-weight women. Compared with normal weight, the loss of disease-free years in men was 1·8 (95% CI -1·3 to 4·9) for underweight, 1·1 (0·7 to 1·5) for overweight, 3·9 (2·9 to 4·9) for class I obese, and 8·5 (7·1 to 9·8) for class II-III obese. The corresponding estimates for women were 0·0 (-1·4 to 1·4) for underweight, 1·1 (0·6 to 1·5) for overweight, 2·7 (1·5 to 3·9) for class I obese, and 7·3 (6·1 to 8·6) for class II-III obese. The loss of disease-free years associated with class II-III obesity varied between 7·1 and 10·0 years in subgroups of participants of different socioeconomic level, physical activity level, and smoking habit.

INTERPRETATION: Mild obesity was associated with the loss of one in ten, and severe obesity the loss of one in four potential disease-free years during middle and later adulthood. This increasing loss of disease-free years as obesity becomes more severe occurred in both sexes, among smokers and non-smokers, the physically active and inactive, and across the socioeconomic hierarchy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41992 (URN)10.1016/S2468-2667(18)30139-7 (DOI)000446908100013 ()30177479 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054896279 (Scopus ID)HHJADULTIS, HHJARNIS (Local ID)HHJADULTIS, HHJARNIS (Archive number)HHJADULTIS, HHJARNIS (OAI)
Funder
NordForsk
Note

FUNDING: NordForsk, UK Medical Research Council, US National Institute on Aging, Academy of Finland, Helsinki Institute of Life Science, and Cancer Research UK.

Available from: 2018-11-09 Created: 2018-11-09 Last updated: 2019-04-04Bibliographically approved
Ander, B., Fransson, E. I., Bergnéhr, D. & Gerdner, A. (2018). Onset of substance use in early adolescence. Journal of Social Work Practice in The Addictions
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Onset of substance use in early adolescence
2018 (English)In: Journal of Social Work Practice in The Addictions, ISSN 1533-256XArticle in journal (Refereed) Accepted
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38625 (URN)
Note

Included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2018-01-22 Created: 2018-01-22 Last updated: 2019-01-10
Fristedt, S., Ernsth-Bravell, M., Kammerlind, A.-S. & Fransson, E. I. (2018). Physical function factors associated with life-space mobility in later life. In: : . Paper presented at 24th Nordic Congress of Gerontology (24NKG), Oslo, Norway, May 2-4, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical function factors associated with life-space mobility in later life
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41047 (URN)
Conference
24th Nordic Congress of Gerontology (24NKG), Oslo, Norway, May 2-4, 2018
Available from: 2018-07-24 Created: 2018-07-24 Last updated: 2019-01-24Bibliographically approved
Larsen, L. B., Ramstrand, N. & Fransson, E. I. (2018). Psychosocial job demand and control: multi-site musculoskeletal pain in Swedish police. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychosocial job demand and control: multi-site musculoskeletal pain in Swedish police
2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Aims

Police have a high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders. While physical factors contributing to this have been explored, little is known regarding the contribution of the psychosocial work environment. This study explores the association between elements of the JDC model, social support and multi-site musculoskeletal pain among Swedish police.

Methods

In this cross-sectional study, response from 4185 police were collected using a self-administered online survey. The survey included questions on psychosocial work environment and musculoskeletal pain, as well as several potential confounding factors. Binominal regression analyses were performed to explore the degree of association between 1) the indices for job demands, job control, social support and multi-site musculoskeletal pain and 2) the four categories of the JDC model, social support and multi-site musculoskeletal pain.

Results

The overall psychosocial work environment of Swedish police was characterised by low control and high social support. Police who reported active and high strain jobs were found to have an increase in the odds ratio for multi-site musculoskeletal pain (OR 1.45 (95% CI 1.08-1.94), and 1.84 (1.51-2.24) respectively). High demands, which is a component in the categories for active and high strain jobs, was also found to be associated with an increase in the odds ratio for multi-site musculoskeletal pain (OR 1.66 (1.45-1.91)). High social support was associated with a decrease in the odds ratio formulti-site musculoskeletal pain (OR 0.72 (0.57-0.86)).

Conclusions

Psychosocial work environment should be considered when investigating factors related to the health and wellbeing of police.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
JDC model; Law enforcement; Musculoskeletal disorders; Occupational epidemiology; SWES
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39058 (URN)10.1177/1403494818801507 (DOI)30253688 (PubMedID)
Note

Included in thesis in its submitted form

Available from: 2018-03-27 Created: 2018-03-27 Last updated: 2018-12-07
Kivimäki, M., Pentti, J., Ferrie, J. E., Batty, G. D., Nyberg, S. T., Jokela, M., . . . Deanfield, J. (2018). Work stress and risk of death in men and women with and without cardiometabolic disease: a multicohort study.. The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology, 6(9), 705-713, Article ID S2213-8587(18)30140-2.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Work stress and risk of death in men and women with and without cardiometabolic disease: a multicohort study.
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2018 (English)In: The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology, ISSN 2213-8587, E-ISSN 2213-8595, Vol. 6, no 9, p. 705-713, article id S2213-8587(18)30140-2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Although some cardiovascular disease prevention guidelines suggest a need to manage work stress in patients with established cardiometabolic disease, the evidence base for this recommendation is weak. We sought to clarify the status of stress as a risk factor in cardiometabolic disease by investigating the associations between work stress and mortality in men and women with and without pre-existing cardiometabolic disease.

METHODS: In this multicohort study, we used data from seven cohort studies in the IPD-Work consortium, initiated between 1985 and 2002 in Finland, France, Sweden, and the UK, to examine the association between work stress and mortality. Work stress was denoted as job strain or effort-reward imbalance at work. We extracted individual-level data on prevalent cardiometabolic diseases (coronary heart disease, stroke, or diabetes [without differentiation by diabetes type]) at baseline. Work stressors, socioeconomic status, and conventional and lifestyle risk factors (systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, smoking status, BMI, physical activity, and alcohol consumption) were also assessed at baseline. Mortality data, including date and cause of death, were obtained from national death registries. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to study the associations of work stressors with mortality in men and women with and without cardiometabolic disease.

RESULTS: We identified 102 633 individuals with 1 423 753 person-years at risk (mean follow-up 13·9 years [SD 3·9]), of whom 3441 had prevalent cardiometabolic disease at baseline and 3841 died during follow-up. In men with cardiometabolic disease, age-standardised mortality rates were substantially higher in people with job strain (149·8 per 10 000 person-years) than in those without (97·7 per 10 000 person-years; mortality difference 52·1 per 10 000 person-years; multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1·68, 95% CI 1·19-2·35). This mortality difference for job strain was almost as great as that for current smoking versus former smoking (78·1 per 10 000 person-years) and greater than those due to hypertension, high total cholesterol concentration, obesity, physical inactivity, and high alcohol consumption relative to the corresponding lower risk groups (mortality difference 5·9-44·0 per 10 000 person-years). Excess mortality associated with job strain was also noted in men with cardiometabolic disease who had achieved treatment targets, including groups with a healthy lifestyle (HR 2·01, 95% CI 1·18-3·43) and those with normal blood pressure and no dyslipidaemia (6·17, 1·74-21·9). In all women and in men without cardiometabolic disease, relative risk estimates for the work stress-mortality association were not significant, apart from effort-reward imbalance in men without cardiometabolic disease (mortality difference 6·6 per 10 000 person-years; multivariable-adjusted HR 1·22, 1·06-1·41).

INTERPRETATION: In men with cardiometabolic disease, the contribution of job strain to risk of death was clinically significant and independent of conventional risk factors and their treatment, and measured lifestyle factors. Standard care targeting conventional risk factors is therefore unlikely to mitigate the mortality risk associated with job strain in this population.

FUNDING: NordForsk, UK Medical Research Council, and Academy of Finland.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-40094 (URN)10.1016/S2213-8587(18)30140-2 (DOI)000442438000017 ()29884468 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85048552925 (Scopus ID)HHJADULTIS (Local ID)HHJADULTIS (Archive number)HHJADULTIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-06-11 Created: 2018-06-11 Last updated: 2018-12-19Bibliographically approved
Wagman, P., Nordin, M., Alfredsson, L., Westerholm, P. J. M. & Fransson, E. I. (2017). Domestic work division and satisfaction in cohabiting adults: Associations with life satisfaction and self-rated health. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 24(1), 24-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Domestic work division and satisfaction in cohabiting adults: Associations with life satisfaction and self-rated health
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2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 24-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The amount and perception of domestic work may affect satisfaction with everyday life, but further knowledge is needed about the relationship between domestic work division and health and well-being.

Aim: To describe the division of, and satisfaction with, domestic work and responsibility for home/family in adults living with a partner. A further aim was to investigate the associations between these aspects and self-rated life satisfaction and health.

Method: Data from the Work, Lipids and Fibrinogen survey collected 2009 were used, comprising 4924 participants living with a partner. Data were analyzed using logistic regression.

Results: The majority shared domestic work and responsibility for home/family equally with their partner. However, more women conducted the majority of the domestic work and were less satisfied with its division. When both division and satisfaction with division was included in the analysis, solely satisfaction with the division and the responsibility were associated with higher odds for good life satisfaction. Regarding health, higher odds for good self-rated health were seen in those who were satisfied with their division of responsibility.

Conclusion and significance: The results highlight the importance of taking into account not solely the actual division of domestic work but also the satisfaction with it.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
Activities in everyday life, gender differences, occupational balance
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-31256 (URN)10.1080/11038128.2016.1217926 (DOI)000392839900004 ()27686578 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84981724857 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-08-16 Created: 2016-08-16 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Dragano, N., Siegrist, J., Nyberg, S. T., Lunau, T., Fransson, E. I., Alfredsson, L., . . . Kivimäki, M. (2017). Effort-reward imbalance at work and incident coronary heart disease: a multi-cohort study of 90,164 individuals. Epidemiology, 28(4), 619-626
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effort-reward imbalance at work and incident coronary heart disease: a multi-cohort study of 90,164 individuals
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2017 (English)In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 619-626Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic evidence for work stress as a risk factor for coronary heart disease is mostly based on a single measure of stressful work known as job strain, a combination of high demands and low job control. We examined whether a complementary stress measure that assesses an imbalance between efforts spent at work and rewards received predicted coronary heart disease.

METHODS: This multi-cohort study (the 'IPD-Work' consortium) was based on harmonized individual-level data from 11 European prospective cohort studies. Stressful weappork in 90,164 men and women without coronary heart disease at baseline was assessed by validated effort-reward imbalance and job strain questionnaires. We defined incident coronary heart disease as the first non-fatal myocardial infarction or coronary death. Study-specific estimates were pooled by random-effects meta-analysis.

RESULTS: At baseline, 31.7% of study members reported effort-reward imbalance at work and 15.9% reported job strain. During a mean follow-up of 9.8 years, 1078 coronary events were recorded. After adjustment for potential confounders, a hazard ratio of 1.16 (95% confidence interval 1.00-1.35) was observed for effort-reward imbalance compared to no imbalance. The hazard ratio was 1.16 (1.01-1.34) for having either effort-reward imbalance or job strain, and 1.41 (1.12-1.76) for having both these stressors compared to having neither effort-reward imbalance nor job strain.

CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with effort-reward imbalance at work have an increased risk of coronary heart disease, and this appears to be independent of job strain experienced. These findings support expanding focus beyond just job strain in future research on work stress.This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CCBY), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2017
Keywords
RISK-FACTORS; JOB STRAIN; PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES; OLDER EMPLOYEES; STRESS; HEALTH; METAANALYSIS; COHORT; MEN
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-35279 (URN)10.1097/EDE.0000000000000666 (DOI)000402541400028 ()28570388 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85016586911 (Scopus ID)HHJADULTIS (Local ID)HHJADULTIS (Archive number)HHJADULTIS (OAI)
Available from: 2017-03-31 Created: 2017-03-31 Last updated: 2018-05-17Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9042-4832

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