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Fransson, Eleonor I.ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9042-4832
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Publications (10 of 105) Show all publications
Ander, B., Fransson, E. I., Bergnéhr, D. & Gerdner, A. (2020). Onset of substance use among early adolescents in Sweden. Journal of Social Work Practice in The Addictions
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Onset of substance use among early adolescents in Sweden
2020 (English)In: Journal of Social Work Practice in The Addictions, ISSN 1533-256XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Problem: Early onset, prevalence, and predictors of substance use - tobacco, alcohol-drinking, alcohol-drunkenness, and drugs - were studied in 13 and 14-year-old boys and girls in Sweden.

Methods: Self-reported data in four communities were used (n = 1,716). A large set of psychological and social factors were tried as predictors of early onset use (n = 1,459).

Results: There were few gender differences and low prevalence. Primary predictor for early onset in tobacco use was availability; perceived parental approval for alcohol use, and delinquent behaviors for alcohol-drunkenness and drug use.

Conclusions: Individual behavioral factors and parental norms seem to be most important in this age.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2020
Keywords
Availability, early adolescence, peers, personality, parents, prevalence, substance onset
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-48232 (URN)10.1080/1533256X.2020.1748973 (DOI)
Available from: 2020-04-30 Created: 2020-04-30 Last updated: 2020-04-30
Johansson, L., Lingfors, H., Golsäter, M., Kristenson, M. & Fransson, E. I. (2019). Can physical activity compensate for low socioeconomic status with regard to poor self-rated health and low quality-of-life?. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 17(1), 1-10, Article ID 33.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can physical activity compensate for low socioeconomic status with regard to poor self-rated health and low quality-of-life?
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2019 (English)In: Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, ISSN 1477-7525, E-ISSN 1477-7525, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 1-10, article id 33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Both high socioeconomic status (SES) and high physical activity (PA) are associated with better self-rated health (SRH) and higher quality-of-life (QoL).

AIM: To investigate whether high levels of PA may compensate for the association between low SES and subjective health outcomes in terms of poorer SRH and lower QoL.

METHOD: Data from a cross-sectional, population-based study (n = 5326) was utilized. Multiple logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for the associations between indicators of SES (economic situation and educational level), SRH and QoL, as well as between the combination of SES and PA in relation to SRH and QoL.

RESULT: Participants with high PA and economic problems had approximately the same OR for good SRH as those with low PA and without economic problems (OR 1.75 [95% CI 1.20-2.54] and 1.81 [1.25-2.63] respectively). Participants with high PA and low education had higher odds for good SRH (OR 3.34 [2.96-5.34] compared to those with low PA and high education (OR 1.46 [0.89-2.39]).Those with high PA and economic problems had an OR of 2.09 [1.42-3.08], for high QoL, while the corresponding OR for those with low PA and without economic problems was 4.38 [2.89-6.63].

CONCLUSION: Physically active people with low SES, had the same or even better odds to report good SRH compared to those with low PA and high SES. For QoL the result was not as consistent. The findings highlight the potential for promotion of PA to reduce SES-based inequalities in SRH.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019
Keywords
Health dialogue, Physical activity, Quality-of-life, Self-rated health, Socioeconomic status
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43213 (URN)10.1186/s12955-019-1102-4 (DOI)000458183400002 ()30736815 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85061263688 (Scopus ID)GOA HHJ 2019 (Local ID)GOA HHJ 2019 (Archive number)GOA HHJ 2019 (OAI)
Available from: 2019-03-01 Created: 2019-03-01 Last updated: 2019-03-06Bibliographically approved
Virtanen, M., Jokela, M., Lallukka, T., Magnusson Hanson, L., Pentti, J., Nyberg, S. T., . . . Kivimäki, M. (2019). Long working hours and change in body weight: analysis of individual-participant data from 19 cohort studies. International Journal of Obesity
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long working hours and change in body weight: analysis of individual-participant data from 19 cohort studies
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Obesity, ISSN 0307-0565, E-ISSN 1476-5497Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Objective:

To examine the relation between long working hours and change in body mass index (BMI).

Methods:

We performed random effects meta-analyses using individual-participant data from 19 cohort studies from Europe, US and Australia (n = 122,078), with a mean of 4.4-year follow-up. Working hours were measured at baseline and categorised as part time (<35 h/week), standard weekly hours (35–40 h, reference), 41–48 h, 49–54 h and ≥55 h/week (long working hours). There were four outcomes at follow-up: (1) overweight/obesity (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2) or (2) overweight (BMI 25–29.9 kg/m2) among participants without overweight/obesity at baseline; (3) obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) among participants with overweight at baseline, and (4) weight loss among participants with obesity at baseline.

Results:

Of the 61,143 participants without overweight/obesity at baseline, 20.2% had overweight/obesity at follow-up. Compared with standard weekly working hours, the age-, sex- and socioeconomic status-adjusted relative risk (RR) of overweight/obesity was 0.95 (95% CI 0.90–1.00) for part-time work, 1.07 (1.02–1.12) for 41–48 weekly working hours, 1.09 (1.03–1.16) for 49–54 h and 1.17 (1.08–1.27) for long working hours (P for trend <0.0001). The findings were similar after multivariable adjustment and in subgroup analyses. Long working hours were associated with an excess risk of shift from normal weight to overweight rather than from overweight to obesity. Long working hours were not associated with weight loss among participants with obesity.

Conclusions:

This analysis of large individual-participant data suggests a small excess risk of overweight among the healthy-weight people who work long hours. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2019
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-46989 (URN)10.1038/s41366-019-0480-3 (DOI)31767974 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85075470775 (Scopus ID);HHJADULTIS, HHJARNIS (Local ID);HHJADULTIS, HHJARNIS (Archive number);HHJADULTIS, HHJARNIS (OAI)
Available from: 2019-12-05 Created: 2019-12-05 Last updated: 2019-12-05
Ahonen, H., Kvarnvik, C., Broström, A., Fransson, E. I., Nygårdh, A., Stensson, M., . . . Lindmark, U. (2019). “No one seems to know”: Studieprotokoll för utvärdering av ett teoretiskt ramverk för oral hälsa avseende reliabilitet och validitet i en obstruktiv sömnapné population. In: : . Paper presented at SFSS Årskongress, 16-18 oktober 2019, Uppsala.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“No one seems to know”: Studieprotokoll för utvärdering av ett teoretiskt ramverk för oral hälsa avseende reliabilitet och validitet i en obstruktiv sömnapné population
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2019 (Swedish)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47387 (URN)
Conference
SFSS Årskongress, 16-18 oktober 2019, Uppsala
Available from: 2020-01-14 Created: 2020-01-14 Last updated: 2020-01-14
Ahonen, H., Kvarnvik, C., Broström, A., Fransson, E. I., Nygårdh, A., Stensson, M. & Lindmark, U. (2019). Oral hälsa och obstruktiv sömnapné- protokoll för en longitudinell studie. In: : . Paper presented at Tandhygienistdagarna, 7-9 april, Arlanda Airport.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oral hälsa och obstruktiv sömnapné- protokoll för en longitudinell studie
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2019 (Swedish)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47385 (URN)
Conference
Tandhygienistdagarna, 7-9 april, Arlanda Airport
Available from: 2020-01-14 Created: 2020-01-14 Last updated: 2020-01-14Bibliographically approved
Larsen, L. B., Ramstrand, N. & Fransson, E. I. (2019). Psychosocial job demand and control: multi-site musculoskeletal pain in Swedish police. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 47(3), 318-325
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychosocial job demand and control: multi-site musculoskeletal pain in Swedish police
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 318-325Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims

Police have a high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders. While physical factors contributing to this have been explored, little is known regarding the contribution of the psychosocial work environment. This study explores the association between elements of the JDC model, social support and multi-site musculoskeletal pain among Swedish police.

Methods

In this cross-sectional study, response from 4185 police were collected using a self-administered online survey. The survey included questions on psychosocial work environment and musculoskeletal pain, as well as several potential confounding factors. Binominal regression analyses were performed to explore the degree of association between 1) the indices for job demands, job control, social support and multi-site musculoskeletal pain and 2) the four categories of the JDC model, social support and multi-site musculoskeletal pain.

Results

The overall psychosocial work environment of Swedish police was characterised by low control and high social support. Police who reported active and high strain jobs were found to have an increase in the odds ratio for multi-site musculoskeletal pain (OR 1.45 (95% CI 1.08-1.94), and 1.84 (1.51-2.24) respectively). High demands, which is a component in the categories for active and high strain jobs, was also found to be associated with an increase in the odds ratio for multi-site musculoskeletal pain (OR 1.66 (1.45-1.91)). High social support was associated with a decrease in the odds ratio formulti-site musculoskeletal pain (OR 0.72 (0.57-0.86)).

Conclusions

Psychosocial work environment should be considered when investigating factors related to the health and wellbeing of police.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
JDC model; Law enforcement; Musculoskeletal disorders; Occupational epidemiology; SWES
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39058 (URN)10.1177/1403494818801507 (DOI)000466373100005 ()30253688 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85059702282 (Scopus ID)
Note

Included in thesis in its submitted form

Available from: 2018-03-27 Created: 2018-03-27 Last updated: 2019-12-12Bibliographically approved
Stadin, M., Nordin, M., Broström, A., Magnusson Hanson, L., Westerlund, H. & Fransson, E. I. (2019). Repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work, and development of suboptimal self-rated health: findings from a 4-year follow-up of the SLOSH study. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 92(5), 717-728
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work, and development of suboptimal self-rated health: findings from a 4-year follow-up of the SLOSH study
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2019 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 92, no 5, p. 717-728Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

The knowledge about the association between Information and Communication Technology (ICT) demands at work and self-rated health (SRH) is insufficient. The aim of this study was to examine the association between repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work, and risk of suboptimal SRH, and to determine modifications by sex or socioeconomic position (SEP).

Methods

A prospective design was used, including repeated measurement of ICT demands at work, measured 2 years apart. SRH was measured at baseline and at follow-up after 4 years. The data were derived from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH), including 4468 gainfully employees (1941 men, 2527 women) with good SRH at baseline.

Results

In the total study sample, repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work was associated with suboptimal SRH at follow-up (OR 1.34 [CI 1.06–1.70]), adjusted for age, sex, SEP, health behaviours, BMI, job strain and social support. An interaction between ICT demands and sex was observed (p = 0.010). The risk was only present in men (OR 1.53 [CI 1.09–2.16]), and not in women (OR 1.17 [CI 0.85–1.62]). The risk of suboptimal SRH after consistently high ICT demands at work was most elevated in participants with high SEP (OR 1.68 [CI 1.02–2.79]), adjusted for age, sex, health behaviours, BMI and job strain. However, no significant interaction between ICT demands and SEP regarding SRH was observed.

Conclusion

Repeated exposure to high ICT demands at work was associated with suboptimal SRH at follow-up, and the association was modified by sex.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
ICT demands at work; Occupational health; Work-related stress; Self-rated health; Gender differences; Socioeconomic position
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42592 (URN)10.1007/s00420-019-01407-6 (DOI)000473828600010 ()30684000 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060727375 (Scopus ID)HOA HHJ 2019 (Local ID)HOA HHJ 2019 (Archive number)HOA HHJ 2019 (OAI)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-1141
Available from: 2019-01-11 Created: 2019-01-11 Last updated: 2020-04-30Bibliographically approved
Sundström, J., Söderholm, M., Söderberg, S., Alfredsson, L., Andersson, M., Bellocco, R., . . . Wiberg, B. (2019). Risk factors for subarachnoid haemorrhage: a nationwide cohort of 950 000 adults. International Journal of Epidemiology, 48(6), 2018-2025
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk factors for subarachnoid haemorrhage: a nationwide cohort of 950 000 adults
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2019 (English)In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 2018-2025Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating disease, with high mortality rate and substantial disability among survivors. Its causes are poorly understood. We aimed to investigate risk factors for SAH using a novel nationwide cohort consortium.

METHODS: We obtained individual participant data of 949 683 persons (330 334 women) between 25 and 90 years old, with no history of SAH at baseline, from 21 population-based cohorts. Outcomes were obtained from the Swedish Patient and Causes of Death Registries.

RESULTS: During 13 704 959 person-years of follow-up, 2659 cases of first-ever fatal or non-fatal SAH occurred, with an age-standardized incidence rate of 9.0 [95% confidence interval (CI) (7.4-10.6)/100 000 person-years] in men and 13.8 [(11.4-16.2)/100 000 person-years] in women. The incidence rate increased exponentially with higher age. In multivariable-adjusted Poisson models, marked sex interactions for current smoking and body mass index (BMI) were observed. Current smoking conferred a rate ratio (RR) of 2.24 (95% CI 1.95-2.57) in women and 1.62 (1.47-1.79) in men. One standard deviation higher BMI was associated with an RR of 0.86 (0.81-0.92) in women and 1.02 (0.96-1.08) in men. Higher blood pressure and lower education level were also associated with higher risk of SAH.

CONCLUSIONS: The risk of SAH is 45% higher in women than in men, with substantial sex differences in risk factor strengths. In particular, a markedly stronger adverse effect of smoking in women may motivate targeted public health initiatives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
Keywords
Stroke, cohort study, epidemiology
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-45507 (URN)10.1093/ije/dyz163 (DOI)000509522900035 ()31363756 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85077223111 (Scopus ID);HHJADULTIS (Local ID);HHJADULTIS (Archive number);HHJADULTIS (OAI)
Available from: 2019-08-09 Created: 2019-08-09 Last updated: 2020-02-27Bibliographically approved
Lindmark, U., Bülow, P. H., Mårtensson, J., Rönning, H., Ahlstrand, I., Broström, A., . . . Sandgren, A. (2019). The use of the concept of transition in different disciplines within health and social welfare: An integrative literature review. Nursing Open, 6(3), 664-675
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The use of the concept of transition in different disciplines within health and social welfare: An integrative literature review
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2019 (English)In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 664-675Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims

To continuing the quest of the concept of transition in nursing research and to explore how the concept of transition is used in occupational therapy, oral health and social work as well as in interdisciplinary studies in health and welfare, between 2003–2013.

Design

An integrative literature review.

Methods

PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, DOSS, SocIndex, Social Science Citation Index and AMED databases from 2003–2013 were used. Identification of 350 articles including the concept of transition in relation to disciplines included. Assessment of articles are in accordance to Meleis' typologies of transition by experts in each discipline. Chosen key factors were entered into Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS).

Results

Meleis' four typologies were found in all studied disciplines, except development in oral health. The health‐illness type was the most commonly explored, whereas in social work and in occupation therapy, situational transitions dominated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
literature review, nursing theory, occupational therapy, oral health, social welfare, social work, theory–practice gap, transition
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43307 (URN)10.1002/nop2.249 (DOI)000476917700002 ()31367388 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85069778425 (Scopus ID)GOA HHJ 2019 (Local ID)GOA HHJ 2019 (Archive number)GOA HHJ 2019 (OAI)
Available from: 2019-03-07 Created: 2019-03-07 Last updated: 2019-09-13Bibliographically approved
Hallgren, J., Fransson, E., Reynolds, C. A., Finkel, D., Pedersen, N. L. & Dahl Aslan, A. K. (2018). Cognitive trajectories in relation to hospitalization among older Swedish adults. Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), 74, 9-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive trajectories in relation to hospitalization among older Swedish adults
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2018 (English)In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 74, p. 9-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION:

Research indicate that cognitive impairment might be related to hospitalization, but little is known about these effects over time.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess cognitive change before and after hospitalization among older adults in a population-based longitudinal study with up to 25 years of follow-up.

METHOD:

A longitudinal study on 828 community living men and women aged 50-86 from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Ageing (SATSA) were linked to The Swedish National Inpatient Register. Up to 8 assessments of cognitive performance (general cognitive ability, verbal, spatial/fluid, memory, and processing speed) from 1986 to 2010 were available. Latent growth curve modelling was used to assess the association between cognitive performance and hospitalization including spline models to analyse cognitive trajectories pre- and post-hospitalization.

RESULTS:

A total of 735 persons (89%) had at least one hospital admission during the follow-up. Mean age at first hospitalization was 70.2 (±9.3)years. Persons who were hospitalized exhibited a lower mean level of cognitive performance in general ability, processing speed and spatial/fluid ability compared with those who were not hospitalized. The two-slope models revealed steeper cognitive decline before hospitalization than after among those with at least one hospitalization event, as compared to non-hospitalized persons who showed steeper cognitive decline after the centering age of 70 years.

CONCLUSIONS:

Persons being hospitalized in late life have lower cognitive performance across all assessed domains. The results indicate that the main decline occurs before the hospitalization, and not after. This might indicate that when you get treatment you also benefit cognitively.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Cognition; Hospitalization; Latent growth curve modelling; Longitudinal study; Old age
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-29963 (URN)10.1016/j.archger.2017.09.002 (DOI)000415983300002 ()28923532 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85029433562 (Scopus ID)HHJARNIS (Local ID)HHJARNIS (Archive number)HHJARNIS (OAI)
Available from: 2016-05-19 Created: 2016-05-19 Last updated: 2019-04-09Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9042-4832

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