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Publications (8 of 8) Show all publications
Asadi, N., Jackson, M. & Fundin, A. (2015). Drivers of complexity in a flexible assembly system - A case study. In: Roberto Teti (Ed.), 48th CIRP International Conference on Manufacturing Systems (CIRP CMS 2015): Key Enabling Technologies for the Factories of the Future: Proceedings of a meeting held 24-26 June 2015, Ischia, Italy. Paper presented at CIRP CMS 2015 - 48th CIRP Conference on MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS, 24-26 June 2015, Ischia (Naples), Italy (pp. 189-194). Elsevier
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Drivers of complexity in a flexible assembly system - A case study
2015 (English)In: 48th CIRP International Conference on Manufacturing Systems (CIRP CMS 2015): Key Enabling Technologies for the Factories of the Future: Proceedings of a meeting held 24-26 June 2015, Ischia, Italy / [ed] Roberto Teti, Elsevier, 2015, p. 189-194Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Various ever-changing market demands have propelled manufacturing companies to offer product variety in an efficient and timely manner. Assembly as a key stage of manufacturing process is used to realise product variety through establishing mixed-product assembly systems. Although establishing a flexible mixed-product assembly system which both offers product variety and absorbs market demands fluctuation is pivotal for maintaining competitive edge in certain industries such as vehicle manufacturing, it is also considered an elaborate task which calls for further investigation. In this paper, complexity in a flexible mixed-product assembly line is investigated and the key drivers of complexity are identified. To fulfil the research objective, a case study during the pilot implementation of a flexible mixed-product assembly concept in a heavy vehicle manufacturing company has been conducted. The results indicate the key factors concerning assembly process, product design, and information and communication technology (ICT) which contribute to complexity in the flexible assembly system. The paper concludes with an outlook for possible future research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Series
Procedia CIRP, E-ISSN 2212-8271 ; 41
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34469 (URN)10.1016/j.procir.2015.12.082 (DOI)000379247600032 ()2-s2.0-84968902339 (Scopus ID)
Conference
CIRP CMS 2015 - 48th CIRP Conference on MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS, 24-26 June 2015, Ischia (Naples), Italy
Available from: 2015-04-17 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Gåsvaer, D., Stålberg, L., Jackson, M., Fundin, A. & Johansson, P. E. (2015). Exploration and Exploitation within Operations. International journal of economics and management engineering, 9(8), 2666-2671
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploration and Exploitation within Operations
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2015 (English)In: International journal of economics and management engineering, ISSN 2225-742X, E-ISSN 2226-7344, Vol. 9, no 8, p. 2666-2671Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Exploration and exploitation capabilities are both important within Operations as means for improvement when managed separately, and for establishing dynamic improvement capabilities when combined in balance. However, it is unclear what exploration and exploitation capabilities imply in improvement and development work within an Operations context. So, in order to better understand how to develop exploration and exploitation capabilities within Operations, the main characteristics of these constructs needs to be identified and further understood. Thus, the objective of this research is to increase the understanding about exploitation and exploration characteristics, to concretize what they translates to within the context of improvement and development work in an Operations unit, and to identify practical challenges. A literature review and a case study are presented. In the literature review, different interpretations of exploration and exploitation are portrayed, key characteristics have been identified, and a deepened understanding of exploration and exploitation characteristics is described. The case in the study is an Operations unit, and the aim is to explore to what extent and in what ways exploration and exploitation activities are part of the improvement structures and processes. The contribution includes an identification of key characteristics of exploitation and exploration, as well as an interpretation of the constructs. Further, some practical challenges are identified. For instance, exploration activities tend to be given low priority, both in daily work as in the manufacturing strategy. Also, the overall understanding about the concepts of exploitation and exploration (or any similar aspect of dynamic improvement capabilities) is very low.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology (WASET), 2015
Keywords
Exploration, exploitation, improvement, innovation, operations, production system, manufacturing, change
National Category
Engineering and Technology Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34499 (URN)
Projects
INNOFACTURE - innovative manufacturing development
Available from: 2015-12-03 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Asadi, N., Jackson, M. & Fundin, A. (2015). Handling product variety in a mixed-product assembly line: A case study. In: Cantamessa M.,Graziosi S.,Weber C.,Cascini G.,Husung S.,Marjanovic D. (Ed.), Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED, Volume 4, Issue DS 80-04: . Paper presented at 20th International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED 2015; Bovisa Campus of Politecnico di Milano, Milan; Italy; 27 July 2015 through 30 July 2015 (pp. 41-50). The Design Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Handling product variety in a mixed-product assembly line: A case study
2015 (English)In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED, Volume 4, Issue DS 80-04 / [ed] Cantamessa M.,Graziosi S.,Weber C.,Cascini G.,Husung S.,Marjanovic D., The Design Society, 2015, p. 41-50Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In today’s fast-changing global market, using mixed-product assembly lines (MPALs) and mixed-model assembly lines (MMALs) allows manufacturing companies to be flexible and to maintain their competitive edge through product variety. Balancing and sequencing issues have been recognized as the main challenges of MPALs and MMALs, but other practical needs of MPALs remain unclear. Recognizing the practical needs of MPALs helps in identifying related requirements for product design, leading to products that closely align with the MPAL concept. The objective of this paper is to offer an industrial perspective on the needs of MPALs and to identify its requirements vis-à-vis product design. To achieve this objective, a single real-time case study in a heavy-vehicle-manufacturing company has been performed. The results from this industrial case study suggest that in order to handle product variety in MPALs and to reduce the related complexity, certain dimensions of flexibility need to be created in the assembly system, and requirements related to product design should be considered simultaneously in order to support assembly processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Design Society, 2015
Keywords
Mixed-product assembly line; Flexibility; Requirements; Product design; Complexity
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34468 (URN)000366982900005 ()2-s2.0-84979662973 (Scopus ID)978-1-904670-67-4 (ISBN)
Conference
20th International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED 2015; Bovisa Campus of Politecnico di Milano, Milan; Italy; 27 July 2015 through 30 July 2015
Available from: 2015-04-17 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Asadi, N., Jackson, M. & Fundin, A. (2015). Identification of the causes of complexity in mixed-product and mixed-model assembly lines. In: : . Paper presented at 22nd EurOMA Conference, OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT FOR SUSTAINABLE COMPETITIVENESS, JUNE 26TH - JULY 1ST, 2015, NEUCHÂTEL, SWITZERLAND.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification of the causes of complexity in mixed-product and mixed-model assembly lines
2015 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The increasing demands for product variety have directed manufacturing companies towards accommodating flexibility by establishing mixed-product and mixed-model assembly lines. However, since greater variety leads to increased complexity, establishing these assembly lines becomes complicated. By conducting a case study, this paper investigates the causes of complexity and the applicability of assembly instructions in one mixed-product and four mixed-model assembly lines in a heavy vehicle manufacturing company. The results indicate a set of causes for complexity and highlight the significance of assembly instructions, as the practical implications for development of flexible assembly systems and design of products closely aligned with them.

National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34470 (URN)
Conference
22nd EurOMA Conference, OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT FOR SUSTAINABLE COMPETITIVENESS, JUNE 26TH - JULY 1ST, 2015, NEUCHÂTEL, SWITZERLAND
Available from: 2015-04-17 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2016-12-28Bibliographically approved
Carlsson, A.-L., Bengtsson, M., Fundin, A., Jackson, M. & Strömberg, A. (2015). Phases of Co-Production: Follow-up Research on the Industrial Research School INNOFACTURE. In: : . Paper presented at Co-creation between Academia and Industry – CAI’15, At Mälardalens University, Västerås.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phases of Co-Production: Follow-up Research on the Industrial Research School INNOFACTURE
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2015 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Mälardalen Univerity is characterised by its close collaboration with companies and with the public sector in the region. A main strategic directions of the university is to develop co-production with partner companies, expressed in the university vision “A Strong MDH – the Coproducing University”. The concept ’co-production’ is in this paper used interchangeably with concept ’co-creation’, emphasising our view of equal participation and interaction with the goal of knowledge, that by the company can be made useful outside the university (see Terblanche, 2014). Based on Mälardalen University’s vision, co-production is a main goal for the Innovation and Product Realization (IPR) environment. IPR is located at the School of Innovation, Design and Engineering and has a common graduate education with three mutually supportive cooperating research groups: Product realization, Innovation management, and Information design. Here ideas from different fields and cultures meet, creating new ideas, possibilities, and knowledge as a result. The approach to develop new insights and knowledge in order to address societal challenges, through working closer between academics and research users, has a potential to improve how research is conducted. Still, there are many questions and challenges in this approach, with need of development: How is research and research education framed and undertaken? What constitutes co-production? What distinguishes reseach in co-production from other forms of research? What are the benefits and barriers of co-production? As we shall see, the follow-up research aim to contribute to how our third level education in a co-production environment can be undertaken.

Keywords
Co-production, co-creation, industrial research school, higher education, on-going evaluation, follow-up research, writing processes, supervision, innovation
National Category
Engineering and Technology Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34485 (URN)
Conference
Co-creation between Academia and Industry – CAI’15, At Mälardalens University, Västerås
Projects
INNOFACTURE - innovative manufacturing developmentFollow-up research at Research School Innofacture
Available from: 2016-11-21 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2016-12-28Bibliographically approved
Asadi, N., Fundin, A. & Jackson, M. (2015). The Essential Constituents of Flexible Assembly Systems: A Case Study in the Heavy Vehicle Manufacturing Industry. Global Journal of Flexible Systems Management, 16(3), 235-250
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Essential Constituents of Flexible Assembly Systems: A Case Study in the Heavy Vehicle Manufacturing Industry
2015 (English)In: Global Journal of Flexible Systems Management, ISSN 0972-2696, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 235-250Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The major challenge of today’s manufacturing industry in tackling demands for a wider range of products with short life-cycle times and meeting customisation requirements has drawn considerable attention towards flexibility in manufacturing systems. As a prominent part of a manufacturing system, an assembly system provides a platform for increasing efficiency while delivering various market demands. However, owing to the dearth of a unified and clear definition of the constituents of flexible assembly systems, in both theory and practice, the recognition of flexibility in assembly systems still remains elusive. In order to establish a sound base for discussing the constituents of flexible assembly systems, this research paper explores the literature concerning flexibility in manufacturing and assembly as well as in flexible systems management domains. To reflect an industrial perspective, a multiple case study of five manufacturing plants in the heavy vehicle industry is performed. By identifying six essential constituents of flexibility in assembly systems, the study proposes a clear definition of flexibility in assembly systems which mainly revolves around mix and volume flexibility. To further enhance the findings, the compatibility of a few previously identified types of manufacturing flexibility in the assembly systems of the case plants is investigated and additional dimensions of flexibility in assembly systems are revealed. Finally, the implications for theory and practice as well as suggestions for future research are discussed.

National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34467 (URN)10.1007/s40171-015-0096-y (DOI)2-s2.0-84938580397 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-04-17 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2016-12-28Bibliographically approved
Asadi, N., Schedin, J., Fundin, A. & Jackson, M. (2014). Considering assembly requirement specifications in product development: identification and approach. In: FAIM 2014 - Proceedings of the 24th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing: Capturing Competitive Advantage via Advanced Manufacturing and Enterprise Transformation: . Paper presented at 24th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing (FAIM), May 20-23, 2014, San Antonio, Texas, USA (pp. 969-976). Curran Associates, Inc.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Considering assembly requirement specifications in product development: identification and approach
2014 (English)In: FAIM 2014 - Proceedings of the 24th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing: Capturing Competitive Advantage via Advanced Manufacturing and Enterprise Transformation, Curran Associates, Inc., 2014, p. 969-976Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Due to the major advantages such as reduced time to market and improved quality at lowered cost, the principles of design for assembly capabilities and concurrent engineering are of great significance when developing new products. However, identifying assembly requirement specifications and considering them in New Product Development (NPD) in a timely manner, while securing efficiency and robustness of assembly processes, still remains a challenging task. In presenting a case study of an NPD project in a manufacturing company, this article focuses on the process of capturing and incorporating the requirements related to the assembly system during the early phases of NPD. Further, the results of the research study indicate the different assembly requirements in the case company and pinpoint the challenges in practices involved in handling them. The assembly requirements identified in this research reflect some of the challenges encountered in handling the requirements, through the investigated requirement practice. Based on the results, the issues of when and how to consider the assembly requirements are highlighted in the conclusions and suggestions for future research are made.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Curran Associates, Inc., 2014
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34471 (URN)2-s2.0-84960875555 (Scopus ID)9781605951737 (ISBN)
Conference
24th International Conference on Flexible Automation and Intelligent Manufacturing (FAIM), May 20-23, 2014, San Antonio, Texas, USA
Available from: 2015-04-17 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Asadi, N., Fundin, A. & Jackson, M. (2013). Exploring optimal flexible assembly systems. In: : . Paper presented at 22nd International Conference on Production Research, July 28-August 1, 2013. Iguassu, Brazil.. Iguassu, Brazil: ICPR22
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring optimal flexible assembly systems
2013 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

As a prominent part of manufacturing system, assembly system provides a platform for increasing efficiency while delivering various market demands. However, due to the lack of a unified and clear definition of flexibility in assembly systems, the recognition of optimal flexibility in assembly system without clashing with efficiency still remains elusive. In order to establish a sound basis to discuss the characteristics of flexible assembly and to address the question of reaching optimal flexibility, this paper makes use of a case study performed in five manufacturing plants. The study proposes a clear definition for flexible assembly and identifies six enablers for flexibility in assembly systems. Further in this research the applicability of few different types of manufacturing flexibility in assembly system is investigated. The paper concludes with discussions and suggestions for future research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Iguassu, Brazil: ICPR22, 2013
Keywords
Flexibility, Manufacturing, Flexible Assembly
National Category
Engineering and Technology Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34466 (URN)
Conference
22nd International Conference on Production Research, July 28-August 1, 2013. Iguassu, Brazil.
Projects
XPRES
Available from: 2013-12-14 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2016-12-28Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3187-7932

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