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Publications (10 of 88) Show all publications
Asadi, N., Jackson, M. & Fundin, A. P. (2019). Implications of realizing mix flexibility in assembly systems for product modularity—A case study. Journal of manufacturing systems, 52, 13-22
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Implications of realizing mix flexibility in assembly systems for product modularity—A case study
2019 (English)In: Journal of manufacturing systems, ISSN 0278-6125, E-ISSN 1878-6642, Vol. 52, p. 13-22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To enable the production of high product variety, mix flexibility in assembly systems is of paramount importance for manufacturing companies. Mixed-product assembly lines (MPALs) are growing as the key means of realizing mix flexibility in many manufacturing sectors, as they absorb volume fluctuations and offer high product variety. With the increasing product variety in MPALs, these assembly systems are becoming more complex. However, the practical challenges of these assembly systems, in particular those concerning product design, have not been adequately addressed. By performing a case study of a heavy machinery manufacturing company, this paper investigates the implications of realizing mix flexibility in an assembly system for product modularity. The findings pinpoint the low level of product modularity in assembly as the most important challenge in MPALs. Accordingly, realizing mix flexibility in an MPAL impacts product modularity through establishing a common assembly sequence and defining similar module contents across distinct product families. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Assembly system, Mix flexibility, Mixed-product assembly line, Product design, Product modularity, Assembly machines, Flexible manufacturing systems, Riveting, Assembly sequence, Assembly systems, Manufacturing companies, Manufacturing sector, Product assembly, Product families, Volume fluctuations, Assembly
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-45367 (URN)10.1016/j.jmsy.2019.04.010 (DOI)2-s2.0-85065784270 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-17 Created: 2019-07-17 Last updated: 2019-07-17Bibliographically approved
Sannö, A., Öberg, A. E., Flores-Garcia, E. & Jackson, M. (2019). Increasing the Impact of Industry-Academia Collaboration through Co-Production. Technology Innovation Management Review, 9(4), 37-47
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increasing the Impact of Industry-Academia Collaboration through Co-Production
2019 (English)In: Technology Innovation Management Review, ISSN 1927-0321, E-ISSN 1927-0321, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 37-47Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Increased competition and globalization motivate us to join forces to enhance the impact of the research conducted. Collaboration between organizations with different views can, however, be difficult to manage and needs awareness and skills to meet different expectations. This article will consider both a mutual industrial and academic perspective into the development of action research and, in six research project cases, empirically explore how the impact can be enhanced by considering certain key factors in the research process. How the phases of problem formulation, methodology, and results are managed is critical for the success of a collaboration and, thereby, its impact. Counter-productive forces that could dilute the progress over time need to be considered given that combining practical relevance and scientific rigour comes with challenges.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Carleton University, 2019
Keywords
action research; industry-academia collaboration; co-production; impact; collaboration; rigour; relevance; key factors
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43859 (URN)10.22215/timreview/1232 (DOI)000467408500005 ()POA JTH 2019 (Local ID)POA JTH 2019 (Archive number)POA JTH 2019 (OAI)
Available from: 2019-06-03 Created: 2019-06-03 Last updated: 2019-06-03Bibliographically approved
Chirumalla, K., Jackson, M., Bruch, J., Andersson, N. & Löv, R. (2018). Exploring feedback loops in the industrialization process: A case study. In: Procedia Manufacturing: . Paper presented at 8th Swedish Production Symposium, SPS 2018; Waterfront Convention Centre, Stockholm, Sweden, 16 - 18 May 2018 (pp. 169-176). Elsevier, 25
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring feedback loops in the industrialization process: A case study
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2018 (English)In: Procedia Manufacturing, Elsevier, 2018, Vol. 25, p. 169-176Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study is to explore the current available practices of feedback loops at different phases in the industrialization process. Although literature highlights the impact of feedback loops for both product and production systems development, there is limited research about how firms utilize the concept of feedback loops in the industrialization process. Based on a case study at a railway component manufacturing company, the paper presents the identified feedback loops and mechanisms that are working well and not working well within the industrialization process. Further, it explains a practical method to improve the current or establish new feedback loops. The paper contributes to the discussion on the application of lean and agile approaches to the industrialization process where feedback loops act as enablers. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Experience feedback, feedback loops, knowledge management, new product introduction, organizational learning
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-45343 (URN)10.1016/j.promfg.2018.06.071 (DOI)2-s2.0-85065642445 (Scopus ID)
Conference
8th Swedish Production Symposium, SPS 2018; Waterfront Convention Centre, Stockholm, Sweden, 16 - 18 May 2018
Available from: 2019-07-16 Created: 2019-07-16 Last updated: 2019-07-16Bibliographically approved
Chirumalla, K., Schedin, J. & Jackson, M. (2016). Development projects, stage-gate models, and degree of newness: Examining the correlation from a production perspective. In: : . Paper presented at 23rd EurOMA conference.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development projects, stage-gate models, and degree of newness: Examining the correlation from a production perspective
2016 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Many companies have adopted stage-gate models to manage different types of development projects, which can vary in degree of newness. Currently, there is limited research on how the development projects, stage-gate models and degree of newness are correlated in practice from a production perspective. Based on a case study at a manufacturing company, this paper examines correlations from a production perspective. The results show that the company runs nine types of development projects in production, and uses two forms of stage-gate models. The degree of newness is not addressed in a structured way in production compared to the product development process.

Keywords
Production system development, Stage-gate models, Degree of newness
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34486 (URN)
Conference
23rd EurOMA conference
Projects
XPRES
Available from: 2016-09-30 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2016-12-28Bibliographically approved
Schedin, J., Svensson Harari, N., Jackson, M. & Deleryd, M. (2016). Management of newness in an assembly system. Journal of Machine Engineering, 16(1), 92-108
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Management of newness in an assembly system
2016 (English)In: Journal of Machine Engineering, ISSN 1895-7595, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 92-108Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The need for new products to suit differentiated customer needs and shorter product life-cycles, forces manufacturers to change or modify products and production systems at more frequent intervals. The objective of this paper is to discuss management of newness within assembly system design in the vehicle industry. Based on a case study covering four assembly development projects, a model using the quality concept of “7M” is presented to evaluate the level of newness. The results show that the model provides a promising platform for evaluation of newness. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wydawnictwo Wrocławskiej Rady FSNT NOT, 2016
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34543 (URN)2-s2.0-84990841813 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-20 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Ahlskog, M., Bruch, J. & Jackson, M. (2016). Managing early manufacturing technology development phases and key activities. In: 23rd EurOMA conference EUROMA 2016: . Paper presented at 23rd EurOMA conference, EUROMA 2016, 17-22 Jun 2016, Trondheim, Norway. International Annual EurOMA Conference
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managing early manufacturing technology development phases and key activities
2016 (English)In: 23rd EurOMA conference EUROMA 2016, International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In order to compete within the manufacturing industry, there is a need to acquire and develop new manufacturing technologies to differentiate the company from others. This paper builds on extant operations management and innovation management literature with the focus on how to managing early manufacturing technology development. A multiple case study has been conducted at a Swedish manufacturing company in the automotive industry and our paper proposes a conceptual process for early manufacturing technology development and the key activities therein. The findings are relevant for managers working with long-term development and the paper concludes by discussing implications and research limitations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Annual EurOMA Conference, 2016
Keywords
Front-end, Pre-development, Manufacturing industries
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34460 (URN)
Conference
23rd EurOMA conference, EUROMA 2016, 17-22 Jun 2016, Trondheim, Norway
Projects
INNOFACTURE - innovative manufacturing development
Available from: 2016-08-26 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Andersen, A.-L., Rösiö, C., Bruch, J. & Jackson, M. (2016). Reconfigurable Manufacturing - An Enabler for a Production System Portfolio Approach. In: Procedia CIRP: . Paper presented at 6th International Conference on Changeable, Agile, Reconfigurable and Virtual Production (CARV), SEP 04-06, 2016, Bath, ENGLAND (pp. 139-144). Elsevier
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reconfigurable Manufacturing - An Enabler for a Production System Portfolio Approach
2016 (English)In: Procedia CIRP, Elsevier, 2016, p. 139-144Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the development of a strategically integrated product and production system portfolio could be enabled by the concept of reconfigurable manufacturing. In previous research, several critical challenges related to developing production system portfolios have been identified, but it has not been investigated how developing a reconfigurable manufacturing concept could aid some of these. Therefore, through a multiple case study, these critical challenges have been investigated in two companies that have recently developed reconfigurable manufacturing concepts for multiple variants and generations of products. The findings reveal that the companies need to deal with several challenges in order to enable a functioning RMS. By running the project separately from the NPD project and to include several product types and production sites the company overcome several challenges. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Series
Procedia CIRP, ISSN 2212-8271 ; 52
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34463 (URN)10.1016/j.procir.2016.07.011 (DOI)000383058300026 ()2-s2.0-84992579924 (Scopus ID)
Conference
6th International Conference on Changeable, Agile, Reconfigurable and Virtual Production (CARV), SEP 04-06, 2016, Bath, ENGLAND
Available from: 2016-10-13 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2019-06-24Bibliographically approved
Flores Garcia, E., Bruch, J., Wiktorsson, M. & Jackson, M. (2016). Towards a Reduction of Uncertainty in Production System Design Decisions. In: Swedish Production Symposium 2016 SPS 2016: . Paper presented at Swedish Production Symposium 2016 SPS 2016, 25 Oct 2016, Lund, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards a Reduction of Uncertainty in Production System Design Decisions
2016 (English)In: Swedish Production Symposium 2016 SPS 2016, 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A tenet of production system design is to increase a manufacturing company’s competitiveness by introducing novel processes, technologies, and products. However, uncertainties exist regarding the actual benefits that can be attained when novelty and change are introduced into a production system. Addressing this issue, this paper explores how manufacturing companies can reduce uncertainties that challenge production system design decisions when significant changes are introduced into the production system. A real-time case study at a Swedish manufacturing company that decided to change its existing product specific assembly system to a multi-product assembly one was performed. Empirical results identify uncertainties challenging production system design configuration, and the activities targeting reduction of uncertainty. To extend current theory, empirical case study data is synthesized with current findings in production system design decisions, and uncertainty reduction in product design decisions. The paper concludes that information acquisition, uncertainty prioritization, project member background, and complexity of change influence uncertainty reduction in production system design decisions. Managerial implications highlight the importance of information acquisition and a structured approach when reducing uncertainties necessary to achieve an efficient and effective production system design. Thus, academic approaches to uncertainty reduction could benefit manufacturing practice.

Keywords
production system design, design decisions, uncertainty
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34491 (URN)
Conference
Swedish Production Symposium 2016 SPS 2016, 25 Oct 2016, Lund, Sweden
Available from: 2016-12-15 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2016-12-28Bibliographically approved
Asadi, N., Jackson, M. & Fundin, A. (2015). Drivers of complexity in a flexible assembly system - A case study. In: Roberto Teti (Ed.), 48th CIRP International Conference on Manufacturing Systems (CIRP CMS 2015): Key Enabling Technologies for the Factories of the Future: Proceedings of a meeting held 24-26 June 2015, Ischia, Italy. Paper presented at CIRP CMS 2015 - 48th CIRP Conference on MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS, 24-26 June 2015, Ischia (Naples), Italy (pp. 189-194). Elsevier
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Drivers of complexity in a flexible assembly system - A case study
2015 (English)In: 48th CIRP International Conference on Manufacturing Systems (CIRP CMS 2015): Key Enabling Technologies for the Factories of the Future: Proceedings of a meeting held 24-26 June 2015, Ischia, Italy / [ed] Roberto Teti, Elsevier, 2015, p. 189-194Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Various ever-changing market demands have propelled manufacturing companies to offer product variety in an efficient and timely manner. Assembly as a key stage of manufacturing process is used to realise product variety through establishing mixed-product assembly systems. Although establishing a flexible mixed-product assembly system which both offers product variety and absorbs market demands fluctuation is pivotal for maintaining competitive edge in certain industries such as vehicle manufacturing, it is also considered an elaborate task which calls for further investigation. In this paper, complexity in a flexible mixed-product assembly line is investigated and the key drivers of complexity are identified. To fulfil the research objective, a case study during the pilot implementation of a flexible mixed-product assembly concept in a heavy vehicle manufacturing company has been conducted. The results indicate the key factors concerning assembly process, product design, and information and communication technology (ICT) which contribute to complexity in the flexible assembly system. The paper concludes with an outlook for possible future research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Series
Procedia CIRP, E-ISSN 2212-8271 ; 41
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34469 (URN)10.1016/j.procir.2015.12.082 (DOI)000379247600032 ()2-s2.0-84968902339 (Scopus ID)
Conference
CIRP CMS 2015 - 48th CIRP Conference on MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS, 24-26 June 2015, Ischia (Naples), Italy
Available from: 2015-04-17 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Gåsvaer, D., Stålberg, L., Jackson, M., Fundin, A. & Johansson, P. E. (2015). Exploration and Exploitation within Operations. International journal of economics and management engineering, 9(8), 2666-2671
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploration and Exploitation within Operations
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2015 (English)In: International journal of economics and management engineering, ISSN 2225-742X, E-ISSN 2226-7344, Vol. 9, no 8, p. 2666-2671Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Exploration and exploitation capabilities are both important within Operations as means for improvement when managed separately, and for establishing dynamic improvement capabilities when combined in balance. However, it is unclear what exploration and exploitation capabilities imply in improvement and development work within an Operations context. So, in order to better understand how to develop exploration and exploitation capabilities within Operations, the main characteristics of these constructs needs to be identified and further understood. Thus, the objective of this research is to increase the understanding about exploitation and exploration characteristics, to concretize what they translates to within the context of improvement and development work in an Operations unit, and to identify practical challenges. A literature review and a case study are presented. In the literature review, different interpretations of exploration and exploitation are portrayed, key characteristics have been identified, and a deepened understanding of exploration and exploitation characteristics is described. The case in the study is an Operations unit, and the aim is to explore to what extent and in what ways exploration and exploitation activities are part of the improvement structures and processes. The contribution includes an identification of key characteristics of exploitation and exploration, as well as an interpretation of the constructs. Further, some practical challenges are identified. For instance, exploration activities tend to be given low priority, both in daily work as in the manufacturing strategy. Also, the overall understanding about the concepts of exploitation and exploration (or any similar aspect of dynamic improvement capabilities) is very low.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology (WASET), 2015
Keywords
Exploration, exploitation, improvement, innovation, operations, production system, manufacturing, change
National Category
Engineering and Technology Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-34499 (URN)
Projects
INNOFACTURE - innovative manufacturing development
Available from: 2015-12-03 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2018-09-12Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4308-2678

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