Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 245) Show all publications
McAuliffe, T., Cordier, R., Chen, Y.-W., Vaz, S., Thomas, Y. & Falkmer, T. (2022). In-the-moment experiences of mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder: a comparison by household status and region of residence. Disability and Rehabilitation, 44(4), 558-572
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In-the-moment experiences of mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder: a comparison by household status and region of residence
Show others...
2022 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 558-572Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: This study compared the in-the-moment experiences among mothers of children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) by their household status (i.e., single versus coupled) and region of residence (i.e., regional versus major city area).

Methods: An experience sampling method was employed to collect data, and a total of 40 mothers used an iOS device to record activity types and in-the-moment experiences for one week during school term. Mann?Whitney U test and multilevel analysis were conducted to compare the experiences of these mothers.

Results: The analyses found the following results: 1) mothers spent most time in childcare and least time in self-care activities; 2) coupled mothers were more likely to feel supported; 3) coupled mothers were less likely to feel supported in domestic tasks; 4) mothers from major city were more likely to feel challenged in self-care activities; and 5) mothers from major city were more likely to feel supported in productivity tasks.

Conclusion: Limited but significant differences between single and coupled mothers, as well as mothers from regional and major city areas, were found. Future research direction and service provisions were suggested.

Implications for rehabilitation

  • This study shows that all mothers spent the most time on childcare and the least amount of time on self-care activities.
  • In-the-moment experiences between single and coupled mothers, as well as mothers from major cities and mothers from regional areas, differ somewhat; however, this study builds evidence to support that these mothers? experiences are similar.
  • The result of the study indicates that single mothers require extra support as they carry similar levels of responsibilities as coupled mothers, but without the support of a partner.
  • Promoting a sense of control may assist all mothers to fully engage in parenting activities.
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
Keywords
Autism spectrum disorders; caregiver; ecological momentary assessment; everyday experience; lone mothers; mothers of children with disability; real-life experience; time-use
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-49692 (URN)10.1080/09638288.2020.1772890 (DOI)000545749100001 ()32552117 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85087050123 (Scopus ID);intsam;1445772 (Local ID);intsam;1445772 (Archive number);intsam;1445772 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-06-23 Created: 2020-06-23 Last updated: 2023-05-08Bibliographically approved
Scott, M., Falkmer, M., Kuzminski, R., Falkmer, T. & Girdler, S. (2022). Process evaluation of an autism-specific workplace tool for employers. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 29(8), 686-698
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Process evaluation of an autism-specific workplace tool for employers
Show others...
2022 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 29, no 8, p. 686-698Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Limited studies exist exploring employers’ capacity in hiring and supporting employees on the autism spectrum, and even fewer have considered interventions targeting employers’ skills and knowledge in enhancing employment opportunities. In response to this need, the Integrated Employment Success Tool (IESTTM) was developed and its effectiveness established in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Furthermore, a process evaluation was conducted to determine the usability and implementation of the IESTTM.

Aims/objectives: The process evaluation was conducted to determine employers’ perceived usability, implementation, and perceived barriers and facilitators in using the IESTTM.

Material and methods: Employers (N = 29) provided their feedback via an online questionnaire. Of these, 11 participants were interviewed, further exploring their experiences. Data were analysed via descriptive statistics and thematic analysis.

Results: While employers’ frequency and usage of the IESTTM varied across workplaces, it was predominantly used to increase employers’ knowledge of autism and implement workplace strategies. A major barrier was the paper-based format of the intervention, with more than 60% of employers indicating the need for an online version.

Conclusions and significance: The process evaluation was a critical step in understanding why the IESTTM was effective, and how it could be further optimized for prospective employers. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
Keywords
Autism spectrum disorder, complex intervention, employment, hiring, work environment
National Category
Occupational Therapy Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-50710 (URN)10.1080/11038128.2020.1820571 (DOI)000571556900001 ()32955966 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85091193921 (Scopus ID);intsam;50710 (Local ID);intsam;50710 (Archive number);intsam;50710 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-09-29 Created: 2020-09-29 Last updated: 2023-05-08Bibliographically approved
Thompson, C., Milbourn, B., Taylor, J. L., Falkmer, T., Bölte, S., Evans, K. & Girdler, S. (2021). Experiences of Parents of Specialist Peer Mentored Autistic University Students. Developmental Neurorehabilitation, 24(6), 368-378
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of Parents of Specialist Peer Mentored Autistic University Students
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 368-378Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Parents continue to support to autistic university students, and consequently, experience considerable stress.

Aim: To explore the experiences of parents of specialist peer mentored university students and to examine these using the ICF as a theoretical framework.

Method: Thirteen semi-structured interviews were completed and analyzed using thematic analysis. Directive content analysis linked the data to the ICF core set for autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

Results: Five interrelated themes emerged: The mentoring relationship is a facilitator, Developing skills for university, Mentoring changes lives, Mentoring is not a substitute for other supports, and University is an emotional rollercoaster. Specialist peer mentoring was linked to Activity and Participation (44%) and Environmental factors (32%) of the ICF core set for ASD.

Conclusion: These results add to the specialist peer mentoring evidence-base, and indicate perceived benefits for autistic university students and their parents. An unintended consequence was that parents broadened their participation in activities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2021
Keywords
Autism spectrum disorder, mentoring, parents, parent–child relationship, supports, university
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-55354 (URN)10.1080/17518423.2021.1886190 (DOI)000618313500001 ()33588672 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85100940570 (Scopus ID);intsam;1620597 (Local ID);intsam;1620597 (Archive number);intsam;1620597 (OAI)
Available from: 2021-12-16 Created: 2021-12-16 Last updated: 2023-05-08Bibliographically approved
D’Arcy, E., Girdler, S., Falkmer, M., Falkmer, T., Whitehouse, A. J. .., Wray, J., . . . Evans, K. (2021). Get it right, make it easy, see it all: Viewpoints of autistic individuals and parents of autistic individuals about the autism diagnostic process in Australia. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 85, Article ID 101792.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Get it right, make it easy, see it all: Viewpoints of autistic individuals and parents of autistic individuals about the autism diagnostic process in Australia
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 85, article id 101792Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The clinical process for being evaluated for an autism diagnosis is often time consuming and stressful for individuals and their caregivers. While experience of and satisfaction with the diagnostic process has been reviewed in the literature, few studies have directly investigated the viewpoints of individuals diagnosed with autism and caregivers of autistic individuals about what is important in the autism diagnostic process.

Method: A Q methodological design was employed to capture the subjective viewpoints about the diagnostic process of individuals on the autism spectrum and caregivers of autistic individuals. Thirty-eight participants responded to a set of 66 statements representing different aspects of the autism diagnostic process.

Results: The analysis identified three significant viewpoints: Get it Right, Make it Easy, and See it All. Participants reflected upon the importance of a comprehensive diagnostic assessment process, ease of diagnostic processes, and a holistic approach to autism diagnosis for autistic individuals and caregivers of autistic individuals.

Conclusions: The findings provide a consumer perspective that encourages reform of the current process for diagnosing autism in Australia, and an insight into what consumers are wanting from diagnostic services. This information is useful for policy-makers and service providers to create a more supportive and client-centred diagnostic process at all levels of service delivery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
ASD, Diagnosis, Consumer perspective, Assessment
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-55353 (URN)10.1016/j.rasd.2021.101792 (DOI)000656684800005 ();intsam;1620586 (Local ID);intsam;1620586 (Archive number);intsam;1620586 (OAI)
Available from: 2021-12-16 Created: 2021-12-16 Last updated: 2023-05-08Bibliographically approved
Zhou, H., Sun, Q. (., Blane, A., Hughes, B., Falkmer, T. & Xia, J. (. (2021). Investigating On-Road Lane Maintenance and Speed Regulation in Post-Stroke Driving: A Pilot Case-Control Study. Geriatrics, 6(1), Article ID 16.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigating On-Road Lane Maintenance and Speed Regulation in Post-Stroke Driving: A Pilot Case-Control Study
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Geriatrics, ISSN 2308-3417, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Stroke can adversely affect the coordination and judgement of drivers due to executive dysfunction, which is relatively common in the post-stroke population but often undetected. Quantitatively examining vehicle control performance in post-stroke driving becomes essential to inspect whether and where post-stroke older drivers are risky. To date, it is unclear as to which indicators, such as lane keeping or speed control, can differentiate the driving performance of post-stroke older drivers from that of normal (neurotypical) older drivers. By employing a case-control design using advanced vehicle movement tracking and analysis technology, this pilot study aimed to compare the variations in driving trajectory, lane keeping and speed control between the two groups of older drivers using spatial and statistical techniques. The results showed that the mean standard deviation of lane deviation (SDLD) in post-stroke participants was higher than that of normal participants in complex driving tasks (U-turn and left turn) but almost the same in simple driving tasks (straight line sections). No statistically significant differences were found in the speed control performance. The findings indicate that, although older drivers can still drive as they need to after a stroke, the decline in cognitive abilities still imposes a higher cognitive workload and more effort for post-stroke older drivers. Future studies can investigate post-stroke adults' driving behaviour at more challenging driving scenarios or design driving intervention programs to improve their executive function in driving.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2021
Keywords
post-stroke drivers, vehicle movement trajectory, standard deviation of lane deviation, speed control
National Category
Vehicle Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-52165 (URN)10.3390/geriatrics6010016 (DOI)000633122300001 ()33572294 (PubMedID)GOA;intsam;733647 (Local ID)GOA;intsam;733647 (Archive number)GOA;intsam;733647 (OAI)
Available from: 2021-04-08 Created: 2021-04-08 Last updated: 2023-05-08Bibliographically approved
Kranz, C., Lee, K., Jadhav, P., Vestlin, L., Barker, M., Jacques, A., . . . Netto, K. (2021). Kinematic and perceptual responses in heavy lifting and pulling: Are there differences between males and females?. Applied Ergonomics, 90, Article ID 103274.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kinematic and perceptual responses in heavy lifting and pulling: Are there differences between males and females?
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 90, article id 103274Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigated kinematic and perceptual differences between the sexes in a heavy lifting and pulling task. A 20 kg box was lifted from floor to chest height, and a 70 kg mannequin pulled across 20m. The effect of height, mass and average grip strength on kinematics and perceived workload was examined in 42 (19 females, 23 males) healthy individuals. A univariate linear regression analysis found females lifted with greater lumbar extension compared to males (p < 0.001), and adopted more hip (p = 0.006) and knee flexion (p = 0.036) in the pulling task. Females reported a greater perceived workload in both tasks (p < 0.001). After the multivariable analysis, only grip strength remained significant for perceived workload in the lift (p = 0.04), and height for knee flexion in the pull (p = 0.009). This highlights that height and strength are important factors driving kinematics and perceived workload. Clinicians may consider these factors in heavy manual tasks, more so than sex. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
Kinematics, Perceived workload, Sex differences
National Category
Medical Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-50709 (URN)10.1016/j.apergo.2020.103274 (DOI)000582799900039 ()32979817 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85091227854 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-09-29 Created: 2020-09-29 Last updated: 2024-01-08Bibliographically approved
Rezae, M., McMeekin, D., Tan, T., Krishna, A., Lee, H. & Falkmer, T. (2021). Public transport planning tool for users on the autism spectrum: from concept to prototype. Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 16(2), 177-187
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Public transport planning tool for users on the autism spectrum: from concept to prototype
Show others...
2021 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 177-187Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: This research explored the challenges of public transport use for individuals on the autism spectrum. It, subsequently, proposed a mobile application solution, coproduced by individuals on the autism spectrum, to facilitate public transport use.

Methods: We, first, conducted a review of the literature to highlight the challenges people on the autism spectrum face when utilizing public transport. We, then, designed a list of mobile application functionalities that address the identified problems. To validate these functionalities, 27 young autistic adults and 19 families of autistic individuals were employed. Finally, based on the findings, we designed a mobile application that helps facilitate public transport use for those on the autism spectrum.

Results: We found that the most prevalent concerns, in public transport use, amongst autistic individuals and their families are safety and spatial awareness. Specific problems include finding one’s way to the bus stop, boarding the correct service and disembarking at the correct stop. Interestingly, anxiety about unexpected events was also a barrier. Sensory sensitivity, similarly, was found to be an obstacle.

Conclusions: This study defined the challenges of public transport use for autistic individuals and proposed a technological solution. The findings can also inform innovators, public transport providers and policymakers to improve public transport accessibility.

Implications for rehabilitation:

  • People on the autism spectrum heavily rely on other individuals, namely family and friends, for their transportation needs. This dependence results in immobility for the autistic individuals and significant time and economical sacrifice for the person responsible for the transportation.
  • Public transport, a cheap and widely available form of transportation, has not yet been clearly studied with individuals on the autism spectrum.
  • We clearly define the challenges of using public transport and put forward a trip planner mobile application, coproduced by autistic individuals, that facilitate it.
  • In the long term, this enhanced travel independence can lead to greater education and employment opportunities and an overall improved quality of life. 
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2021
Keywords
ASD, Autism spectrum, mobile application, mobility, public transport, transit app
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47088 (URN)10.1080/17483107.2019.1646818 (DOI)000639165900005 ()31381860 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85070444422 (Scopus ID);intsam;1381381 (Local ID);intsam;1381381 (Archive number);intsam;1381381 (OAI)
Available from: 2019-12-20 Created: 2019-12-20 Last updated: 2024-01-08Bibliographically approved
Lim, Y. H., Lee, H. C., Falkmer, T., Allison, G. T., Tan, T., Lee, W. L. & Morris, S. L. (2020). Effect of visual information on postural control in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Journal of autism and developmental disorders, 50, 3320-3325
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of visual information on postural control in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 50, p. 3320-3325Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Visual information is crucial for postural control. Visual processing in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was hypothesized to be less efficient and thus they would display a less stable standing posture than typically developing children. The present study compared the static standing responses and attentional demands of 15 children with ASD and 18 control participants in conditions of eyes open and eyes closed. The results showed that postural responses and attention invested in standing were similar between the participant groups in the two visual conditions. Both groups displayed a more stable posture when their eyes were open in comparison to eyes closed. The finding suggests that normal postural control development could occur in children with ASD. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Keywords
Attention, Autistic disorder, Postural balance, Sensorimotor, Sensory information, Visual processing
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-47194 (URN)10.1007/s10803-019-04182-y (DOI)000561767100021 ()31435819 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85071292042 (Scopus ID);HHJCHILDIS (Local ID);HHJCHILDIS (Archive number);HHJCHILDIS (OAI)
Note

Article type: Brief Report.

Available from: 2019-12-20 Created: 2019-12-20 Last updated: 2023-05-08Bibliographically approved
Thompson, C., McDonald, J., Kidd, T., Falkmer, T., Bölte, S. & Girdler, S. (2020). "I don't want to be a patient": Peer mentoring partnership fosters communication for autistic university students. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 27(8), 625-640
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"I don't want to be a patient": Peer mentoring partnership fosters communication for autistic university students
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 625-640Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Despite recognition of the benefits of post-school education in improving life outcomes for autistic adults their university completion rates remain low.

Aim: To explore the experiences of undergraduate autistic university students participating in specialist peer mentoring (SPM) to identify active ingredients in the peer mentoring process and to examine the impact of SPM on social communication.

Material and method: A total of 30 (8 female; M age = 22.3; SD = 6.7) undergraduate autistic university students engaged in SPM participated in this study. A quantitative pre-test post-test design examined changes in autistic traits. In parallel, the experiences of participating in SPM were explored through semi-structured interviews.

Results: Improvements were noted at post-test on the Social Responsiveness Scale-2 total score p = 0.02), and its Social Communication, (p = 0.03) and Social Motivation (p = 0.03) sub-scales. Four themes emerged from the interviews: Developing Partnership and Understanding, Modelling and Practising Communication, Psychological Support and Grading and Planning Skills.

Conclusions: These results indicated that the mentor-mentee partnership was a crucial active ingredient of SPM. This partnership appeared to modify social cognition and motivation for autistic university students through modelling and practising communication.

Significance: These results demonstrate that SPM can support participation at university for autistic university students.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2020
Keywords
Autism spectrum disorder, University, mentee, mentor, mentorship, self-advocacy
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-48349 (URN)10.1080/11038128.2020.1738545 (DOI)000520554700001 ()32180486 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85082747254 (Scopus ID);HHJCHILDIS (Local ID);HHJCHILDIS (Archive number);HHJCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2020-05-12 Created: 2020-05-12 Last updated: 2023-05-08Bibliographically approved
Black, M. H., Mahdi, S., Milbourn, B., Scott, M., Gerber, A., Esposito, C., . . . Girdler, S. (2020). Multi-informant International Perspectives on the Facilitators and Barriers to Employment for Autistic Adults. Autism Research, 13(7), 1195-1214
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multi-informant International Perspectives on the Facilitators and Barriers to Employment for Autistic Adults
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Autism Research, ISSN 1939-3792, E-ISSN 1939-3806, Vol. 13, no 7, p. 1195-1214Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Employment rates for autistic individuals are poor, even compared to those from other disability groups. Internationally, there remains limited understanding of the factors influencing employment across the stages of preparing for, gaining, and maintaining employment. This is the third in a series of studies conducted as part of an International Society for Autism Research (INSAR) policy brief intended to improve employment outcomes for autistic individuals. A multi-informant international survey with five key stakeholder groups, including autistic individuals, their families, employers, service providers, and researchers, was undertaken in Australia, Sweden, and the United States to understand the facilitators and barriers to employment for autistic adults. A total of 687 individuals participated, including autistic individuals (n = 246), family members (n = 233), employers (n = 35), clinicians/service providers (n = 123), and researchers (n = 50). Perceptions of the facilitators and barriers to employment differed significantly across both key stakeholder groups and countries, however, ensuring a good job match and focusing on strengths were identified by all groups as important for success. Key barriers to employment included stigma, a lack of understanding of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and communication difficulties. Results suggest that a holistic approach to employment for autistic individuals is required, aimed at facilitating communication between key stakeholders, addressing attitudes and understanding of ASD in the workplace, using strength-based approaches and providing early work experience. LAY SUMMARY: Autistic individuals experience significant difficulty getting and keeping a job. This article presents a survey study involving autistic individuals, their families, employers, service providers and researchers in Australia, Sweden, and the United States to understand their perspectives on the factors that support or act as barriers to employment. While perspectives varied across key stakeholders, strategies such as using a holistic approach, targeting workplace attitudes and understanding, focusing on strengths, and providing early work experience are important for success. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Keywords
adults, autism, cross-cultural, employment, key stakeholders
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-48111 (URN)10.1002/aur.2288 (DOI)000519468800001 ()32170919 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85082617991 (Scopus ID);HHJCHILDIS,HLKCHILDIS (Local ID);HHJCHILDIS,HLKCHILDIS (Archive number);HHJCHILDIS,HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2020-04-09 Created: 2020-04-09 Last updated: 2023-05-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0756-6862

Search in DiVA

Show all publications