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Nilsson Dahlström, Åsa
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 12) Show all publications
Nilsson Dahlström, Å., Dahlin, J. & Tunón, H. (2021). Pathfinders for the future?: Indigenous rights and traditional knowledge in Sweden. Sustainability, 13(20), Article ID 11195.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pathfinders for the future?: Indigenous rights and traditional knowledge in Sweden
2021 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 20, article id 11195Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Indigenous peoples have for the past decades increasingly argued that not only is their traditional knowledge to be recognized in the management of their traditional territories, but that Indigenous control and self-governance over territories and natural resources are crucial for long-term sustainability of the land and cultural revitalisation of its people. In recent years, the Saami in Sweden have also presented themselves as pathfinders, offering advice and solutions for a more sustainable future not only for the Saami society, but for all of Sweden. This paper investigates how Saami claims for rights and stewardship in environmental management are related to Saami cultural revitalisation, within a Swedish colonial framework. It is based on an investigation of the Saami policy positions expressed in policy documents and opinion pieces produced by organisations representing the Saami, linking claims for rights and environmental stewardship with cultural revitalisation and a more sustainable development for all.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2021
Keywords
Biological diversity, Cultural heritage, Indigenous peoples, Indigenous rights, Pathfinders, Resource extraction, Revitalisation, Saami people, Stewardship, Traditional knowledge
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-54935 (URN)10.3390/su132011195 (DOI)000715080400001 ()2-s2.0-85117222419 (Scopus ID)GOA;;772916 (Local ID)GOA;;772916 (Archive number)GOA;;772916 (OAI)
Available from: 2021-10-25 Created: 2021-10-25 Last updated: 2022-02-10Bibliographically approved
Nilsson Dahlström, Å. (2021). Te pūkenga atawhai—cultural awareness raising and conservation for future use in aotearoa new zealand. Sustainability, 13(18), Article ID 73.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Te pūkenga atawhai—cultural awareness raising and conservation for future use in aotearoa new zealand
2021 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 13, no 18, article id 73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

At Te Papa Atawhai/Department of Conservation in Aotearoa New Zealand, ‘cultural dif-ferences’ account for some of the difficulties that department staff experience in their interaction with Indigenous Māori in conservation work. To meet the need for better ‘cultural awareness’ of Māori conservation principles, the department has facilitated the development of Te Pūkenga Atawhai, which is an introductory course to Māori views of conservation offered to all department staff. For Māori, the course is also a part of a broader revitalisation process for Māori culture and society and a recognition of their bicultural Treaty partnership with the Crown. The paper investigates how the Te Pūkenga Atawhai course addresses the perceived difficulties with cultural differences between DOC and Māori in conservation work, and how Pou Kura Taiao and participants perceive its usefulness for teaching staff about Māori views of conservation. Some department staff argue that the course has contributed to a better understanding of Māori culture and conservation principles; others that it is too politicised and engages in cultural ‘tokenism’ of little relevance for conservation work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2021
Keywords
Aotearoa New Zealand, Conservation, Cultural awareness, Cultural revitalisation, Indigenous peoples, Māori
National Category
History and Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-54691 (URN)10.3390/su131810073 (DOI)000702019500001 ()2-s2.0-85114719895 (Scopus ID)GOA;;766644 (Local ID)GOA;;766644 (Archive number)GOA;;766644 (OAI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2003-1921, 2006-1873
Available from: 2021-09-20 Created: 2021-09-20 Last updated: 2022-02-10Bibliographically approved
Nilsson Dahlström, Å. (2019). Det lyckligaste landet i världen? Om kastom och hållbar lycka på Vanuatu. In: Kjell O. Lejon (Ed.), Tankar om lycka: några kulturvetenskapliga forskares perspektiv (pp. 99-133). Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Det lyckligaste landet i världen? Om kastom och hållbar lycka på Vanuatu
2019 (Swedish)In: Tankar om lycka: några kulturvetenskapliga forskares perspektiv / [ed] Kjell O. Lejon, Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag , 2019, p. 99-133Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2019
Keywords
Lycka, Hållbar livsstil, Vanuatu
National Category
Cultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-48423 (URN);;miljPIL (Local ID)9789173319782 (ISBN);;miljPIL (Archive number);;miljPIL (OAI)
Available from: 2019-11-29 Created: 2020-05-18 Last updated: 2020-06-03Bibliographically approved
Nilsson Dahlström, Å. (2018). Om indianer, ädla vildar och strategisk essentialism. In: Kjell O. Lejon (Ed.), Perspektiv på "den andre": (pp. 183-209). Carlsson Bokförlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Om indianer, ädla vildar och strategisk essentialism
2018 (Swedish)In: Perspektiv på "den andre" / [ed] Kjell O. Lejon, Carlsson Bokförlag , 2018, p. 183-209Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Carlsson Bokförlag, 2018
National Category
Social Anthropology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-48425 (URN);;miljPIL (Local ID)9789173318976 (ISBN);;miljPIL (Archive number);;miljPIL (OAI)
Available from: 2018-03-06 Created: 2020-05-18 Last updated: 2020-06-03Bibliographically approved
Nilsson Dahlström, Å. (2017). Bland osaliga andar och andra i Ayyalur, Tamil Nadu. In: Kjell O. Lejon (Ed.), Föreställningar om döden: forskares aspekter på vår existens och dess begränsningar (pp. 176-199). Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bland osaliga andar och andra i Ayyalur, Tamil Nadu
2017 (Swedish)In: Föreställningar om döden: forskares aspekter på vår existens och dess begränsningar / [ed] Kjell O. Lejon, Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag , 2017, p. 176-199Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2017
Keywords
Döden
National Category
Philosophy, Ethics and Religion
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-48427 (URN);;miljPIL (Local ID)9789173318112 (ISBN);;miljPIL (Archive number);;miljPIL (OAI)
Available from: 2017-04-28 Created: 2020-05-18 Last updated: 2020-06-03Bibliographically approved
Näslund, J. & Nilsson Dahlström, Å. (2017). Framing work and play in a small village school. In: : . Paper presented at The 12th Annual International Ethnography Symposium Politics and Ethnography in an Age of Uncertainty, The University of Manchester, UK, 29th August - 1st September 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Framing work and play in a small village school
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Introduction

Up until the late 20th century, small village elementary schools, connected in many ways with the church, provided education for most rural children in Sweden. With increasing urbanisation and the centralisation of public services in Sweden, small village schools are increasingly abandoned in favour of larger schools that can accommodate more pupils, have more efficient services, be more democratic and not connected with any special church communion.

Background

Village schools, like Kyrkskolan (Church School) in the village of Bankeryd, provided the local children with much more than formal education, it also functioned as an arena for play and social acceptance. The closing down of Kyrkskolan has meant that children are referred to the larger schools where they lack a local social connection and respect for their individual differences. This has also meant that the tolerance for social difference has changed. Pupils with social or cognitive challenges who were accepted as persons in the local village school become both invisible and hyper-visible in the larger schools, when they are collectively stigmatised together with other pupils with similar challenges.

In the age-integrated school classes at Kyrkskolan, pupils of different ages worked and played together inside and outside of the school buildings, where also previous generations of local people have worked and played – thus uniting village people of different ages in their shared experiences of the same school, the gestalt of the school. The social life of a village school therefore fundamentally expresses local identities and values over time, beyond the school context.

The research

Researching, visually documenting and framing, the social life of a village school thus requires more than finding the aesthetically most pleasing photographic and analytical angle. In order to access the meaning of the social life of a place, the researcher must move beyond being merely an occasional observer, to become a participant observer. It is through the shared experiences of those places that the researcher can approach their meanings and be able to represent the places and the people from an insider’s point of view. By regularly participating, observing and respecting school work and play over a longer period of time in a naturally occurring way, the researcher is able to identify what characterises that social environment, how it is understood by the other participants, and therefore how it can be documented and presented in a meaningful way.

For the researcher of this project, it did not become apparent what the research was about until late in the photographic process. Instead of zooming in on the work, the research suggested that the meaning of the social life of the school children should best be pictured within a framework of work as play. This paper deals with the methodological challenges faced by the ethnographer/photographer, and discusses the interplay between place, time and representation, as well as the aesthetics of photography as a means to picture peoples’ lives. 

National Category
Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-48428 (URN);;miljPIL (Local ID);;miljPIL (Archive number);;miljPIL (OAI)
Conference
The 12th Annual International Ethnography Symposium Politics and Ethnography in an Age of Uncertainty, The University of Manchester, UK, 29th August - 1st September 2017
Available from: 2017-10-09 Created: 2020-05-18 Last updated: 2020-06-03Bibliographically approved
Nilsson Dahlström, Å. (2009). "Shoot, dig, and shut up !" Differing perceptions of wolves in urban and rural Sweden. Ethnologie Française, 39(1), 101-108
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Shoot, dig, and shut up !" Differing perceptions of wolves in urban and rural Sweden
2009 (English)In: Ethnologie Française, ISSN 0046-2616, E-ISSN 2101-0064, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 101-108Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

"Shoot, dig, and shut up !" Differing perceptions of wolves in urban and rural Sweden The wolf population in Sweden has grown considerably in recent years, which has created conflicts in society. Urban people and national authorities are in favour of the strict protection of wolves, while rural people and the indigenous Saami reindeer herders are increasingly frustrated over wolf damages. Despite national protection efforts, the number of illegally killed wolves each year is increasing, and it is possible today to talk about the ethnic dimensions of a "wolf conflict" between urban and rural people in Sweden.

Keywords
Saami reindeer herders; Sweden; Urban; Wolves
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-48430 (URN)10.3917/ethn.091.0101 (DOI);;miljPIL (Local ID);;miljPIL (Archive number);;miljPIL (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-03 Created: 2020-05-18 Last updated: 2020-06-03Bibliographically approved
Nilsson Dahlström, Å. (2009). The Two-Way Appropriation of Indigenous Knowledge: Environmental Management Policies and the Laponia Process. Journal of Northern Studies (2), 39-57
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Two-Way Appropriation of Indigenous Knowledge: Environmental Management Policies and the Laponia Process
2009 (English)In: Journal of Northern Studies, ISSN 1654-5915, no 2, p. 39-57Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the face of climatic changes and environmental problems, indigenous knowledge is increasingly being accepted as an alternative to Western science in conservation policies. While indigenous knowledge may help indigenous empowerment, it is also placed under the control of the authorities whose science and strucutres it is meant to challenge. Indigenous knowledge is therefore the subject of a two-way appropriation by indigenous peoples as well as environmental authorities. This process is illustrated by the Sami reindeer herders in the World Heritage site of Laponia in Arctic Sweden, who are negotating a new joint management scheme with Swedish authorities, including a Sami majority on the park board. Sami indigenous knowledge will form the basis for the new management policies, but with minimal changes to existing national legislation. While the Sami will gain some political control, Swedish authorities will also gain access to and control over Sami indigenous knowledge, hence a two-way appropriation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Umeå University & The Royal Skyttean Society, 2009
Keywords
Sami, Laponia, reindeer herding, Sweden, indigenous knowledge, indigenous peoples, appropriation, sustainable development, environment, Arctic
National Category
Social Anthropology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-48431 (URN);;miljPIL (Local ID);;miljPIL (Archive number);;miljPIL (OAI)
Available from: 2010-08-30 Created: 2020-05-18 Last updated: 2020-06-03Bibliographically approved
Nilsson Dahlström, Å. & Green, C. (2008). Indigenous traditional knowledge and sustainable development in the World Heritage sites of Laponia in Sweden and Tongariro in New Zealand. In: Björn Frostell, Åsa Danielsson, Lovisa Hagberg, Björn-Ola Linnér, Ebba Lisberg Jensen (Ed.), Science for Sustainable Development: The Social Challenge with Emphasis on the Conditions for Change. Paper presented at The 2nd VHU Conference on Science for Sustainable Development, September 6-7, 2007, Linköping (pp. 203-209). Uppsala: Föreningen Vetenskap för hållbar utveckling, VHU
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indigenous traditional knowledge and sustainable development in the World Heritage sites of Laponia in Sweden and Tongariro in New Zealand
2008 (English)In: Science for Sustainable Development: The Social Challenge with Emphasis on the Conditions for Change / [ed] Björn Frostell, Åsa Danielsson, Lovisa Hagberg, Björn-Ola Linnér, Ebba Lisberg Jensen, Uppsala: Föreningen Vetenskap för hållbar utveckling, VHU , 2008, p. 203-209Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Conservation management systems which include indigenous traditional knowledge have increasingly been recognized by international conservation authorities as complementary or even superior to the more conventional conservation approach. Many indigenous peoples, including the Maori in New Zealand and the Saami in Sweden, have actively promoted their traditional knowledge as pivotal for sustainable development, and are now gaining more control over the management of their traditional areas. However, perceptions of traditional knowledge and its relation to sustainable development often differ between indigenous peoples and conservation authorities, and posit a challenge to the formulation of conservation policies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Föreningen Vetenskap för hållbar utveckling, VHU, 2008
Keywords
indigenous peoples, traditional knowledge, Laponia, Tongariro, sustainable development, World Heritage
National Category
Social Anthropology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-48432 (URN);;miljPIL (Local ID)978-91-633-3660-7 (ISBN);;miljPIL (Archive number);;miljPIL (OAI)
Conference
The 2nd VHU Conference on Science for Sustainable Development, September 6-7, 2007, Linköping
Available from: 2010-08-30 Created: 2020-05-18 Last updated: 2020-06-03Bibliographically approved
Nilsson Dahlström, Å. (2008). Joint management does not "just happen": the management of Laponia, Tongariro, Kakadu and Uluru-Kata Tjuta World Heritage sites. In: Peter Sköld (Ed.), Människor i Norr: Samisk forskning på nya vägar. Paper presented at Vaartoe - Samisk forskning inför framtiden, Umeå universitet 2006 (pp. 117-139). Umeå: Centrum för samisk forskning
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Joint management does not "just happen": the management of Laponia, Tongariro, Kakadu and Uluru-Kata Tjuta World Heritage sites
2008 (English)In: Människor i Norr: Samisk forskning på nya vägar / [ed] Peter Sköld, Umeå: Centrum för samisk forskning , 2008, p. 117-139Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The nomination and appointment of World Heritage sites ential a willingness from UNESCO and its member states to recognise the value of cultural and biological diversity on Earth by protecting representative or threatened cultural landscapes on behalf of all mankind and for all times. After recommendation from UNESCO, it has become increasingly popular among member states to nominate sites including living indigenous cultures, in order to provide these sites with international protection, and in order to benefit from the World Heritage status. However, the ways in which these kind of sites are protected differ greatly between states and particular sites. Whereas one indigenous people may own the land of the World Heritage site and have considerable influence on how the site is managed, another indigenous people may remain politically marginal and only play a symbolical role as carriers of indigenous culture. This paper intends to compare the situation for the indigenous people in four structurally similar World Heritage sites: Laponia in Sweden, Tongariro in New Zealand and Uluru-Kata Tjuta and Kakadu in Australia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Centrum för samisk forskning, 2008
Series
Miscellaneous publications, ISSN 1651-5455 ; 11
Keywords
joint management, indigenous knowledge, World Heritage, Laponia, Tongariro, Kakadu, Uluru-Kata Tjuta
National Category
Social Anthropology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-48433 (URN);;miljPIL (Local ID)978-91-977304-0-2 (ISBN);;miljPIL (Archive number);;miljPIL (OAI)
Conference
Vaartoe - Samisk forskning inför framtiden, Umeå universitet 2006
Available from: 2010-08-30 Created: 2020-05-18 Last updated: 2020-06-02Bibliographically approved
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