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Carlberg, L. & Granlund, M. (2019). Achievement and participation in schools for young adolescents with self-reported neuropsychiatric disabilities: A cross-sectional study from the Southern part of Sweden. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 47(2), 199-206
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Achievement and participation in schools for young adolescents with self-reported neuropsychiatric disabilities: A cross-sectional study from the Southern part of Sweden
2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 199-206Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Schools are expected to be an environment where children can reach their fullest potential and develop their talents, personality, as well as their mental and physical abilities. Children with disabilities often have restricted participation and lower achievement in school. The aim is to investigate if there are any differences in participation and achievement in school between adolescents, with and without self-reported neuropsychiatric disabilities, and to explore the relations between achievement and participation. 

Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out based on data collected from 1520 adolescents in the sixth and seventh grade, from the south of Sweden. Multiple logistic regression was conducted to explore the relationship between having a neuropsychiatric disability, with participation and achievement, and how different factors affected this relationship. 

Results: Having a self-reported neuropsychiatric disability increases the likelihood of having restricted participation (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 2.89; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.99–4.23) and lower achievement in school (AOR: 2.94; 95% CI: 2.06–4.24). These adolescents were also more likely to have negative relationships to their teachers, be bullied, have poorer connectedness to their parents, come from families with less money, be trying drugs and be male, in comparison to the adolescents without a neuropsychiatric disability. The odds of having lower achievement increased with lower engagement and absenteeism from class. 

Conclusions: Adolescents with self-reported neuropsychiatric disabilities have a disadvantaged situation in school, and are exposed to factors that could have long-term negative effects. More longitudinal research is required to conclude what factors are causing restricted participation and low achievement.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Participation, achievement, adolescents, neuropsychiatric disabilities, school
National Category
Pediatrics Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-39410 (URN)10.1177/1403494818788415 (DOI)000462758700015 ()30070167 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85052201143 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-05-14 Created: 2018-05-14 Last updated: 2019-04-11Bibliographically approved
Backman, E., Granlund, M. & Karlsson, A.-K. (2019). Documentation of everyday life and health care following gastrostomy tube placement in children: a content analysis of medical records. Disability and Rehabilitation, 1-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Documentation of everyday life and health care following gastrostomy tube placement in children: a content analysis of medical records
2019 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Everyday routines play a vital role in child functioning and development. This study explored health professionals' documentation of everyday life and health care during the first year following gastrostomy tube placement in children and the content of intervention goals.

METHODS: The medical records of 39 children (median age 38 months, min-max: 15-192) in one region of Sweden were analysed. A content analysis approach was used with an inductive qualitative analysis supplemented by a deductive, quantitative analysis of documented intervention goals following the ICF-CY.

RESULTS: One overall theme, "Seeking a balance", captured the view of life with a gastrostomy and the health care provided. Two categories, "Striving for physical health" and "Depicting everyday life" with seven sub-categories, captured the key aspects of the documentation. Twenty-one children (54%) had intervention goals related to the gastrostomy, and these goals primarily focused on the ICF-CY component "Body functions".

CONCLUSIONS: To some extent the medical records reflected different dimensions of everyday life, but the intervention goals clearly focused on bodily aspects. Understanding how health care for children using a gastrostomy is documented and planned by applying an ecocultural framework adds a valuable perspective and can contribute to family-centred interventions for children using a gastrostomy. Implications for Rehabilitation There is a need for increased awareness in healthcare professionals for a more consistent and holistic healthcare approach in the management of children with gastrostomy tube feeding. This study suggests that an expanded focus on children's participation in everyday mealtimes and in the healthcare follow-up of gastrostomy tube feeding is important in enhancing the intervention outcome. Multidisciplinary teams with a shared bio-psycho-social understanding of health would contribute to a situation in which the everyday lives of households adapt to living with gastrostomy. Routine care for children with gastrostomy should follow a checklist combining crucial physiological aspects of gastrostomy tube feeding with seemingly mundane family functions in order to achieve a successful gastrostomy tube feeding intervention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Ecocultural theory, ICF, documentation, enteral nutrition, multidisciplinary, pediatric
National Category
Nursing Gastroenterology and Hepatology Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43357 (URN)10.1080/09638288.2019.1573383 (DOI)30763520 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85061826776 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-03-20 Created: 2019-03-20 Last updated: 2019-03-20
Janeslätt, G., Wallin, S. W. & Granlund, M. (2019). Intervention in time-processing ability, daily time management and autonomy in children with intellectual disabilities aged 10–17 years – A cluster randomised trial. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 66(1), 110-120
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intervention in time-processing ability, daily time management and autonomy in children with intellectual disabilities aged 10–17 years – A cluster randomised trial
2019 (English)In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, ISSN 0045-0766, E-ISSN 1440-1630, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 110-120Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background/aim

Difficulties with management of time are frequently observed in children and youth with intellectual disabilities (IDs). The aim of this study was to evaluate a new intervention programme ‘My Time’ to improve time‐processing ability (TPA) in children with IDs aged 10–17 years (n = 61).

Methods

Cluster randomised and waiting‐list control group design was used. Data collection included the Kit for assessment of TPA, the Time‐Parent scale and a self‐rating of autonomy to assess occupational performance in daily life. The method was implemented over an 8‐week period. Effect size (ES) was calculated and an analysis of covariance on the individual level and a two‐stage process on the cluster level.

Results

The estimated mean improvement in the KaTid‐Child score from baseline (t1) to t2 was significantly higher in the intervention group compared to the waiting‐list group, ES Cohen's d = 0.64.

Conclusion

The results present first evidence of the effectiveness of a new occupational therapy intervention programme (‘My Time’) to facilitate TPA in children with mild to moderate IDs. Children with IDs aged 10–17 years could improve their TPA at a measurable pace when given intervention. The method could complement interventions using time‐assistive devices. Children with IDs should be identified to guide intervention. Further research is necessary to establish whether using the intervention programme can facilitate the development of TPA in younger children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
child; intellectual disability; intervention study; time management; time perception
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42059 (URN)10.1111/1440-1630.12547 (DOI)000457755700013 ()30548268 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85058218284 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-11-19 Created: 2018-11-19 Last updated: 2019-03-01Bibliographically approved
Granlund, M. (2019). Is independence the same as participation for young people with disabilities? [Letter to the editor]. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 61(2), 116-117
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is independence the same as participation for young people with disabilities?
2019 (English)In: Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, ISSN 0012-1622, E-ISSN 1469-8749, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 116-117Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41557 (URN)10.1111/dmcn.14041 (DOI)000456180800009 ()30221758 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85053553753 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-09-24 Created: 2018-09-24 Last updated: 2019-02-20Bibliographically approved
Lygnegård, F., Almqvist, L., Granlund, M. & Huus, K. (2019). Participation profiles in domestic life and peer relations as experienced by adolescents with and without impairments and long-term health conditions. Developmental Neurorehabilitation, 22(1), 27-38
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Participation profiles in domestic life and peer relations as experienced by adolescents with and without impairments and long-term health conditions
2019 (English)In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 27-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To investigate how individual and environmental factors relate to self-reported participation profiles in adolescents with and without impairments or long-term health conditions.

METHODS: A person-oriented approach (hierarchical cluster analysis) was used to identify cluster groups of individuals sharing participation patterns in the outcome variables frequency perceived importance in domestic life and peer relations. Cluster groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA).

RESULTS: A nine-cluster solution was chosen. All clusters included adolescents with impairment and long-term health conditions. Perceived importance of peer relations was more important than frequent attendance in domestic-life activities. Frequency of participation in dialogues and family interaction patterns seemed to affect the participation profiles more than factors related to body functions.

CONCLUSION: Type of impairment or long-term health condition is a weaker determinant of membership in clusters depicting frequency and perceived importance in domestic life or peer relations than dialogue and family environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
ICF-CY, Participation pattern, cluster analysis, everyday functioning, person-oriented method
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38459 (URN)10.1080/17518423.2018.1424266 (DOI)000456885100005 ()29313401 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85040965252 (Scopus ID)HOA HHJ 2019 (Local ID)HOA HHJ 2019 (Archive number)HOA HHJ 2019 (OAI)
Available from: 2018-01-11 Created: 2018-01-11 Last updated: 2019-02-20Bibliographically approved
Bölte, S., Mahdi, S., Vries, P. J. d., Granlund, M., Robison, J. E., Shulman, C., . . . Selb, M. (2019). The Gestalt of functioning in autism spectrum disorder: Results of the international conference to develop final consensus International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health core sets. Autism, 23(2), 449-467
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Gestalt of functioning in autism spectrum disorder: Results of the international conference to develop final consensus International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health core sets
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2019 (English)In: Autism, ISSN 1362-3613, E-ISSN 1461-7005, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 449-467Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Autism spectrum disorder is associated with diverse social, educational, and occupational challenges. To date, no standardized, internationally accepted tools exist to assess autism spectrum disorder–related functioning. World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health can serve as foundation for developing such tools. This study aimed to identify a comprehensive, a common brief, and three age-appropriate brief autism spectrum disorder Core Sets. Four international preparatory studies yielded in total 164 second-level International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health candidate categories. Based on this evidence, 20 international autism spectrum disorder experts applied an established iterative decision-making consensus process to select from the candidate categories the most relevant ones to constitute the autism spectrum disorder Core Sets. The consensus process generated 111 second-level International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health categories in the Comprehensive Core Set for autism spectrum disorder—one body structure, 20 body functions, 59 activities and participation categories, and 31 environmental factors. The Common Brief Core Set comprised 60 categories, while the age-appropriate core sets included 73 categories in the preschool version (0- to 5-year-old children), 81 in the school-age version (6- to 16-year-old children and adolescents), and 79 in the older adolescent and adult version (⩾17-year-old individuals). The autism spectrum disorder Core Sets mark a milestone toward the standardized assessment of autism spectrum disorder–related functioning in educational, administrative, clinical, and research settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
autism spectrum disorder, assessment, consensus conference, disability, functioning, International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health core sets
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38726 (URN)10.1177/1362361318755522 (DOI)000458879600016 ()29378422 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85041576618 (Scopus ID)HOA HHJ 2019;HHJCHILDIS;HLKCHILDIS (Local ID)HOA HHJ 2019;HHJCHILDIS;HLKCHILDIS (Archive number)HOA HHJ 2019;HHJCHILDIS;HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-02-02 Created: 2018-02-02 Last updated: 2019-03-14Bibliographically approved
Mahdi, S., Ronzano, N., Knüppel, A., Dias, J. C., Albdah, A., Chien-Ho, L., . . . Bölte, S. (2018). An international clinical study of ability and disability in ADHD using the WHO-ICF framework. European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 27(10), 1305-1319
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An international clinical study of ability and disability in ADHD using the WHO-ICF framework
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2018 (English)In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 27, no 10, p. 1305-1319Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This is the fourth and final study designed to develop International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF, and children and youth version, ICF-CY) core sets for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). To investigate aspects of functioning and environment of individuals with ADHD as documented by the ICF-CY in clinical practice settings. An international cross-sectional multi-centre study was applied, involving nine units from eight countries: Denmark, Germany, India, Italy, Portugal, Saudi Arabia, Sweden and Taiwan. Clinicians and clinical researchers rated the functioning level of 112 children, adolescents and adults with ADHD using the extended ICF-CY checklist version 2.1a. The ratings were based on a variety of information sources, such as medical records, medical history, clinical observations, clinical questionnaires, psychometric tests and structured interviews with participants and family members. In total, 113 ICF-CY categories were identified, of which 50 were related to the activities and participation, 33 to environmental factors and 30 to body functions. The clinical study also yielded strengths related to ADHD, which included temperament and personality functions and recreation and leisure. The study findings endorse the complex nature of ADHD, as evidenced by the many functional and contextual domains impacted in ADHD. ICF-CY based tools can serve as foundation for capturing various functional profiles and environmental facilitators and barriers. The international nature of the ICF-CY makes it possible to develop user-friendly tools that can be applied globally and in multiple settings, ranging from clinical services and policy-making to education and research. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
ADHD, Assessment, Clinical study, DSM, Functioning, ICD, Neurodevelopmental disorder, Psychiatry, Quality of life
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38918 (URN)10.1007/s00787-018-1124-1 (DOI)000445887500006 ()29455340 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042124348 (Scopus ID)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-02-27 Created: 2018-02-27 Last updated: 2018-10-23Bibliographically approved
Mahdi, S., Albertowski, K., Almodayfer, O., Arsenopoulou, V., Carucci, S., Dias, J. C., . . . Bölte, S. (2018). An International Clinical Study of Ability and Disability in Autism Spectrum Disorder Using the WHO-ICF Framework. Journal of autism and developmental disorders, 48(6), 2148-2163
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An International Clinical Study of Ability and Disability in Autism Spectrum Disorder Using the WHO-ICF Framework
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2018 (English)In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 2148-2163Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This is the fourth international preparatory study designed to develop International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF, and Children and Youth version, ICF-CY) Core Sets for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Examine functioning of individuals diagnosed with ASD as documented by the ICF-CY in a variety of clinical settings. A cross-sectional study was conducted, involving 11 units from 10 countries. Clinical investigators assessed functioning of 122 individuals with ASD using the ICF-CY checklist. In total, 139 ICF-CY categories were identified: 64 activities and participation, 40 body functions and 35 environmental factors. The study results reinforce the heterogeneity of ASD, as evidenced by the many functional and contextual domains impacting on ASD from a clinical perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Keywords
ASD, Assessment, Clinical study, DSM, Functioning, ICD, Neurodevelopmental disorder
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38811 (URN)10.1007/s10803-018-3482-4 (DOI)000431955400025 ()29423605 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85041536181 (Scopus ID)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-02-12 Created: 2018-02-12 Last updated: 2019-01-21Bibliographically approved
Mahdi, S., Viljoen, M., Yee, T., Selb, M., Singhal, N., Almodayfer, O., . . . Bolte, S. (2018). An international qualitative study of functioning in autism spectrum disorder using the World Health Organization international classification of functioning, disability and health framework. Autism Research, 11(3), 463-475
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An international qualitative study of functioning in autism spectrum disorder using the World Health Organization international classification of functioning, disability and health framework
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2018 (English)In: Autism Research, ISSN 1939-3792, E-ISSN 1939-3806, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 463-475Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This is the third in a series of four empirical studies designed to develop International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Sets for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The present study aimed to describe functioning in ASD (as operationalized by the ICF) derived from the perspectives of diagnosed individuals, family members, and professionals. A qualitative study using focus groups and semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 stakeholder groups (N = 90) from Canada, India, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, and Sweden. Meaningful concepts from the focus groups and individual interviews were linked to ICF categories using a deductive qualitative approach with standardized linking procedures. The deductive qualitative content analysis yielded meaningful functioning concepts that were linked to 110 ICF categories across all four ICF components. Broad variation of environmental factors and activities and participation categories were identified in this study, while body functions consisted mainly of mental functions. Body structures were sparsely mentioned by the participants. Positive aspects of ASD included honesty, attention to detail, and memory. The experiences provided by international stakeholders support the need to understand individuals with ASD in a broader perspective, extending beyond diagnostic criteria into many areas of functioning and environmental domains. This study is part of a larger systematic effort that will provide the basis to define ICF Core Sets for ASD, from which assessment tools can be generated for use in clinical practice, research, and health care policy making.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
autism spectrum disorder; functioning; strength; assessment; clinical practice; ICF; qualitative study
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38206 (URN)10.1002/aur.1905 (DOI)000428367000005 ()29226604 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85044431649 (Scopus ID)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2017-12-15 Created: 2017-12-15 Last updated: 2019-02-05Bibliographically approved
Pinto, A. I., Grande, C., Coelho, V., Castro, S., Granlund, M. & Björck-Åkesson, E. (2018). Beyond diagnosis: the relevance of social interactions for participation in inclusive preschool settings. Developmental Neurorehabilitation, 1-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond diagnosis: the relevance of social interactions for participation in inclusive preschool settings
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2018 (English)In: Developmental Neurorehabilitation, ISSN 1751-8423, E-ISSN 1751-8431, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: This study aims to explore the role of three specific factors within the child-environment interaction process - engagement, independence and social interactions - in influencing development and learning of children with disabilities in inclusive preschool settings. The main question is whether children can be categorised in homogenous groups based on engagement, independence and social interactions (proximal variables within a biopsychosocial framework of human development). The study also examined whether children with the same diagnosis would group together or separately, when trying to identify clusters of engagement, independence and social interactions, and additionally whether such clusters vary as a function of individual child characteristics, and/or as a function of structural and process characteristics of preschool environment.

METHODS: Data was taken from an intervention study conducted in mainstream preschools in Portugal. A person-centered cluster analysis was conducted to explore group membership of children with various diagnoses, based on their engagement, independence and social interaction profiles.

RESULTS: Results show that children clustered based on similarity of engagement, independence and social interaction patterns, rather than on diagnosis. Besides, it was found that quality of peer interaction was the only predictor of cluster membership.

CONCLUSION: These findings support the argument that participation profiles may be more informative for intervention purposes than diagnostic categories, and that preschool process quality, namely peer interaction, is crucial for children's participation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Engagement, functioning, independence, participation, social interactions
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42024 (URN)10.1080/17518423.2018.1526225 (DOI)30289341 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85054523893 (Scopus ID)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Local ID)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (Archive number)HHJCHILDIS, HLKCHILDIS (OAI)
Available from: 2018-11-13 Created: 2018-11-13 Last updated: 2019-02-15
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9597-039X

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