Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 64) Show all publications
Kapetanovic, S., Skoog, T., Bohlin, M. & Gerdner, A. (2019). Aspects of the parent–adolescent relationship and associations with adolescent risk behaviors over time. Journal of family psychology, 33(1), 1-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aspects of the parent–adolescent relationship and associations with adolescent risk behaviors over time
2019 (English)In: Journal of family psychology, ISSN 0893-3200, E-ISSN 1939-1293, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Parents’ actions and knowledge of adolescents’ whereabouts play key roles in preventing risk behaviors in early adolescence, but what enables parents to know about their adolescents’ activities and what links there are to adolescent risk behaviors, such as substance use and delinquent behavior, remain unclear. In this study, we investigated whether different aspects of the parent–adolescent relationship predict parental knowledge, and we examined the direct and indirect longitudinal associations between these aspects of the parent–adolescent relationship and adolescents’ self-reported delinquent behavior and substance use. The participants were 550 parents and their adolescent children from two small and two midsized municipalities in Sweden. Parental data were collected when the adolescents were 13 years old (mean), and adolescent data on risk behaviors were collected on two occasions, when they were 13 and 14 years of age (mean). Structural path analyses revealed that adolescent disclosure, parental solicitation, and parental control predicted parental knowledge, with adolescent disclosure being the strongest source of parental knowledge and the strongest negative predictor of adolescent risk behaviors. Parenting competence and adolescents’ connectedness to parents were indirectly, through adolescent disclosure and parental solicitation and parental control, associated with substance use and delinquent behavior. Some paths differed for boys and girls. In conclusion, confident parenting and a close parent–adolescent relationship in which adolescent disclosure is promoted, seem protective of adolescent engagement in risk behaviors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Psychological Association (APA), 2019
Keywords
parent-adolescent relationships, parental knowledge, adolescent disclosure, parenting competence, risk behaviors
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41007 (URN)10.1037/fam0000436 (DOI)000457254800001 ()29999345 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85049785735 (Scopus ID)PP HHJ 2018 (Local ID)PP HHJ 2018 (Archive number)PP HHJ 2018 (OAI)
Available from: 2018-07-19 Created: 2018-07-19 Last updated: 2019-04-10Bibliographically approved
Kapetanovic, S., Skoog, T., Bohlin, M. C. & Gerdner, A. (2019). Does one Size Fit All?—Linking Parenting With Adolescent Substance Use and Adolescent Temperament. Journal of research on adolescence
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does one Size Fit All?—Linking Parenting With Adolescent Substance Use and Adolescent Temperament
2019 (English)In: Journal of research on adolescence, ISSN 1050-8392, E-ISSN 1532-7795Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Using longitudinal Swedish data from 1,373 early-adolescent youths, this study aims to answer the question of whether the previously established protective function of parental knowledge and its sources—adolescent disclosure, parental solicitation, and parental control—on substance use among early-adolescents is moderated by the adolescent's temperament. Adolescent temperament moderated several links between parental knowledge and its sources and adolescent substance use. The most pronounced moderating results were found for those adolescents with fearless, socially detached and thrill-seeking tendencies. For these “detached thrill-seekers”, bidirectional links between adolescent disclosure and substance use, and negative links between parental solicitation and substance use were found. We recommend, therefore, that adolescent temperament is considered when designing parenting programs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2019
National Category
Substance Abuse
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-43413 (URN)10.1111/jora.12489 (DOI)2-s2.0-85062936891 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-02 Created: 2019-04-02 Last updated: 2019-05-14
Monwell, B. & Gerdner, A. (2019). Opioid maintenance treatment: trajectories in and out of treatment. Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, 73(1), 24-30
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Opioid maintenance treatment: trajectories in and out of treatment
2019 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 24-30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Problem: Although efficacy studies of opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) have shown evidence of treatment benefits, there is still need for studies on its effectiveness in natural clinical processes. This study investigates the development in health, substance use and social conditions of those who applied for OMT, including those denied access or discharged.

Method: First, persons assessed for admittance in 2005–2011 (n = 127) were categorized into four trajectory groups based on whether they were admitted or denied (n = 19), discharged (n = 31), readmitted (n = 21) or had been undergoing OMT without interruption (n = 56). Second, 99 of these, the analytical sample, were interviewed at follow-up using (a) the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) for seven problem-areas and housing, and (b) self-rated change in 11 problem areas. The ASI was compared to baseline interviews after 55 months (mean). Third, outcomes within groups was studied in relation to alternative interventions.

Results: Within the analytical sample, those denied OMT showed no improvements at group level, those discharged had some improvements, more if readmitted than if not and those with uninterrupted OMT showed the most comprehensive improvements. Those outside OMT, denied and discharged, had considerable mortality risks related to ongoing drug use, especially in lack of well-planned alternative interventions.

Conclusion: Improvements strongly relate to access to OMT. This study underscores that access to OMT improves the situation in all areas investigated and decreases the risk for drug-related death. It underscores the importance of two major risk situations, i.e. being denied OMT and being discharged.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Opioid maintenance treatment, drop-outs, treatment outcome, treatment process
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42623 (URN)10.1080/08039488.2018.1539120 (DOI)000466445300004 ()30636473 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060035376 (Scopus ID)HOA HHJ 2019 (Local ID)HOA HHJ 2019 (Archive number)HOA HHJ 2019 (OAI)
Available from: 2019-01-14 Created: 2019-01-14 Last updated: 2019-06-14Bibliographically approved
Skårner, A. & Gerdner, A. (2018). Conceptual and theoretical framework of the MAP-NET: A social networks analysis tool. Cogent Psychology, 5(1), 1-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conceptual and theoretical framework of the MAP-NET: A social networks analysis tool
2018 (English)In: Cogent Psychology, ISSN 2331-1908, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Social network factors constantly recur as central to explaining initiation, continuation and cessation of substance use and maintenance of long-term recovery. MAP-NET (Measure and Analysis of Personal NETwork) is a computerised instrument for assessing the personal social networks (PSN) of persons with substance misuse and related problems, and it is designed to be used in clinical interviews and to provide relevant measures for research. The article focuses on the conceptual and theoretical framework of MAP-NET and how it is operationalised. The MAP-NET interview makes it possible to identify problems and resources both in general and in relation to the specific circumstances that can be attributed to substance misuse. It provides a basis for a facetted analysis of structural, interactional and functional aspects of PSN—and how these interact. MAP-NET offers possibilities for longitudinal studies on how social networks develop over time and how this relates to substance use as well as to recovery with or without treatment. Implications for network-oriented psychosocial interventions are suggested.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cogent OA, 2018
Keywords
computerised assessment, ego-centric, network map, personal social networks, social support, substance misuse
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-41201 (URN)10.1080/23311908.2018.1488515 (DOI)000437331100001 ()2-s2.0-85049510297 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-22 Created: 2018-08-22 Last updated: 2018-08-22Bibliographically approved
Ander, B., Fransson, E. I., Bergnéhr, D. & Gerdner, A. (2018). Onset of substance use in early adolescence. Journal of Social Work Practice in The Addictions
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Onset of substance use in early adolescence
2018 (English)In: Journal of Social Work Practice in The Addictions, ISSN 1533-256XArticle in journal (Refereed) Accepted
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
National Category
Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-38625 (URN)
Note

Included in thesis in manuscript form.

Available from: 2018-01-22 Created: 2018-01-22 Last updated: 2019-01-10
Gerdner, A., Skårner, A., Holmberg, S. C. & Håkansson, A. (2018). Validation of MAP-NET — A network analysis tool. Paper presented at 2018/11/29/. Cogent Psychology, 5(1), Article ID 1553654.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validation of MAP-NET — A network analysis tool
2018 (English)In: Cogent Psychology, ISSN 2331-1908, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 1553654Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

MAP-NET (Measure and Analysis of Personal NETwork) is a computerised instrument for assessment of the personal networks of persons with substance use disorders and related problems, with information on individual, relational and structural levels, designed to give immediate feedback to be used in clinical interviews, and to provide relevant measures for research. The study investigates its validity and reliability, by using a combination of validation strategies including factor analysis and internal consistency of scales, convergent and predictive validity, sensitivity to social desirability and agreement with collateral interviews. The scales demonstrate satisfactory construct validity and acceptable to excellent internal consistency and convergent and predictive validity with relevant other scales. There is low sensitivity to social desirability and other bias. There is substantial agreement with collateral interviews on the most sensitive variables. Thus, MAP-NET has the qualities needed for clinical use and research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cogent OA, 2018
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-42572 (URN)10.1080/23311908.2018.1553654 (DOI)000455468700001 ()
Conference
2018/11/29/
Available from: 2019-01-10 Created: 2019-01-10 Last updated: 2019-01-24Bibliographically approved
Monwell, B. & Gerdner, A. (2017). Opiates versus other opioids – are these relevant as diagnostic categorizations?. Heroin Addiction and Related Clinical Problems, 19(6), 39-48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Opiates versus other opioids – are these relevant as diagnostic categorizations?
2017 (English)In: Heroin Addiction and Related Clinical Problems, ISSN 1592-1638, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 39-48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:

For more than three decades, the international diagnostic systems have used the term ‘opioids’, including opiates, yet research publications continue to use an older terminology. In 2010, new Codes of Statutes for “opiate replacement therapy” (ORT) was brought into effect in Sweden, stating that only those “dependent on opiates” – explicitly described as heroin, morphine or opium – were eligible. Those addicted to other opioids were then denied access. This study examines the relevance of the distinction of opiates vs. other opioids. Are there differences in the severity of opioid dependence or concerning other substance-related diagnoses?

Methods:

Ninety-nine individuals participated: 1) the opiate group (n = 69), and 2) the other opioids group (n=30). Structured interviews covered the ICD-10 criteria of nine different types of addictive substances. For opioids, questions were asked separately in relation to opiates versus other opioids.

Results:

The two groups fulfilled the criteria for opioid dependence to the same extent, with most participants meeting all six criteria, so indicating a severe opioid dependence problem. Both opiates and other opioids had contributed to their development of opioid dependence, and both groups, to the same high degree, showed comorbidity affecting other dependence conditions.

Conclusions:

This study reveals that the two categories of opioids used contribute to the development of opioid dependence and that the term ‘opioids’ can be suitably used to convey a unitary concept in diagnostic terms. There was no support for treating the two groups differently. The study calls for more stringent use of terminology in accordance with the international diagnostic systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Associazione per l'Utilizzo delle Conoscenze Neuroscientifiche a fini Sociali, 2017
Keywords
Maintenance treatment; Buprenorphine; opioid; opiate; dependence; diagnosis; nosology
National Category
Substance Abuse Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-37848 (URN)000416893800005 ()2-s2.0-85035240103 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-11-09 Created: 2017-11-09 Last updated: 2019-04-10Bibliographically approved
Monwell, B., Blix, O., Gerdner, A. & Bülow, P. (2016). Drug list as a cognitive support to provide detailed information on a patient's drug use: A comparison of two methods within the assessment of drug misuse and dependence. Substance Use & Misuse, 51(11), 1470-1476
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Drug list as a cognitive support to provide detailed information on a patient's drug use: A comparison of two methods within the assessment of drug misuse and dependence
2016 (English)In: Substance Use & Misuse, ISSN 1082-6084, E-ISSN 1532-2491, Vol. 51, no 11, p. 1470-1476Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: It is important to identify the type of drugs a patient has used, especially when polydrug misuse has increased and new drugs and patterns of misuse are quickly spread. Objectives: In order to acquire sufficient information about drug use, an effective and simple form of mapping is needed.

Methods: Persons actualized for Opioid Substitution Treatment (n = 135) were interviewed about their drug-history in a two-stage model. First, they were asked to write down the drugs misused, and dot those injected with a felt pen. Second, they were asked to do the same on a drug list provided as a cognitive support. For a subsample of 50 persons, the drug list included four fictive drugs to evaluate possible over-reporting.

Results: The use of a drug list did not take longer than the traditional way of using open questions, i.e. about 5–8 minutes. Using a drug list gave a cognitive support resulting in a much higher proportion/number of reported drugs. The majority, 97%, used more than one drug. None of the patients who were given the drug list that included fictive drug names reported having used any of them. The respondents reported 43 additional substances to the 125 given on the list which improve our knowledge of the drug scene.

Conclusions/importance: Using a drug-list was superior to open questions; it does not take more time and provides additional, clinically relevant information than open questions. Using a drug-list also gives improved knowledge of new drugs entering the local drug scene.

Keywords
cognitive support, diagnostic instruments, drug anamnesis, opioid substitution therapy, Substance use disorders
National Category
Substance Abuse
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-31258 (URN)10.1080/10826084.2016.1186697 (DOI)000382325500008 ()27355832 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84976385510 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-08-16 Created: 2016-08-16 Last updated: 2019-04-10Bibliographically approved
MacDonald, K., Thomas, M. L., Sciolla, A. F., Schneider, B., Pappas, K., Bleijenberg, G., . . . Wingenfeld, K. (2016). Minimization of childhood maltreatment is common and consequential: Results from a large, multinational sample using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. PLoS ONE, 11(1), 1-16, Article ID e0146058.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Minimization of childhood maltreatment is common and consequential: Results from a large, multinational sample using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire
Show others...
2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 1-16, article id e0146058Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Childhood maltreatment has diverse, lifelong impact on morbidity and mortality. The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) is one of the most commonly used scales to assess and quantify these experiences and their impact. Curiously, despite very widespread use of the CTQ, scores on its Minimization-Denial (MD) subscale-originally designed to assess a positive response bias-are rarely reported. Hence, little is known about this measure. If response biases are either common or consequential, current practices of ignoring the MD scale deserve revision. Therewith, we designed a study to investigate 3 aspects of minimization, as defined by the CTQ's MD scale: 1) its prevalence; 2) its latent structure; and finally 3) whether minimization moderates the CTQ's discriminative validity in terms of distinguishing between psychiatric patients and community volunteers. Archival, item-level CTQ data from 24 multinational samples were combined for a total of 19,652 participants. Analyses indicated: 1) minimization is common; 2) minimization functions as a continuous construct; and 3) high MD scores attenuate the ability of the CTQ to distinguish between psychiatric patients and community volunteers. Overall, results suggest that a minimizing response bias-as detected by the MD subscale-has a small but significant moderating effect on the CTQ's discriminative validity. Results also may suggest that some prior analyses of maltreatment rates or the effects of early maltreatment that have used the CTQ may have underestimated its incidence and impact. We caution researchers and clinicians about the widespread practice of using the CTQ without the MD or collecting MD data but failing to assess and control for its effects on outcomes or dependent variables. © 2016 MacDonald et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Keywords
child; childhood; Childhood Trauma Questionnaire; dependent variable; human; human tissue; major clinical study; mental patient; prevalence; scientist; validity; volunteer
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-29689 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0146058 (DOI)000369528200007 ()26815788 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84958214032 (Scopus ID)HHJSALVEIS (Local ID)HHJSALVEIS (Archive number)HHJSALVEIS (OAI)
Note

Running title: Minimizing Matters: The Childhood Trauma Questionnaire

Available from: 2016-03-31 Created: 2016-03-31 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Carlsson, E., Magnusson, A., Tompa, A., Bülow, P., Gerdner, A. & Faresjö, M. (2016). Psychological stress affects the numbers of circulating CD56+CD16+ and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+CD127- cells and induce an immune response towards type 1 diabetes-related autoantigens in young women.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychological stress affects the numbers of circulating CD56+CD16+ and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+CD127- cells and induce an immune response towards type 1 diabetes-related autoantigens in young women
Show others...
2016 (English)Article in journal (Other academic) Submitted
National Category
Immunology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:hj:diva-31751 (URN)
External cooperation:
Available from: 2016-09-12 Created: 2016-09-12 Last updated: 2016-09-12
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8158-0486

Search in DiVA

Show all publications